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Featured Is it all bad ?

Discussion in 'Bonneville' started by John T, Feb 13, 2017.

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  1. MrOrange

    MrOrange The Lunatics have definitely taken over !!!!
    Staff Member Subscriber

    Oct 28, 2015
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    Agree not acceptable, but by mid December roads are pretty shitty, I give up by end of October 'ish as I think it's too wet and crappy and some roads are gritted by then. Will not have spoked wheels again, they are horrible to look after, unless they are stainless,. Too easy for crap and moisture to attack the surface.

    But rust on rear shock is not acceptable, unless been put away wet. Really doesn't take long for any rust to take hold.

    Did you put any 'protection' on it before riding? I know first job I do is ACF50 a new bike before it gets wet (which happens a lot in Scotland).

    Rub the offending part down with a ball of scrunched tinfoil and coke (or pepsi), then give a good a good soak of protection, should be OK then. Found that works well, did on the bit of rust found on my America (sissy bar, mainly), which by the looks of it had been put away wet by the previous owner.
     
  2. old git

    old git Well-Known Member

    Jul 4, 2016
    203
    93
    Aberdeenshire, Scotland
    #42 old git, Feb 16, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2017
    I can only assume you mean me, and I'm not offended ;). I have got a downer on Triumph for a reason, the reason being they sold me something that's defective. If you've had loads of Triumphs without a problem that's great and I have to be honest I bought the T120 based partly on what I'd read about "new Triumph" in terms of quality and reliability. The bike itself is in my view a thing of beauty and that was also a major factor. That coupled with a teenage lust for an original T120 made the bike a must have thing - I sold my Fireblade FFS and have no regrets. That's how much I wanted the bike and still do. Read my first few posts, I doubt if I could have praised the bike any more.

    It may not be popular, or you may not agree but the fact is some parts of some T120's, including mine, are suffering from problems. I've got mates that it would possibly be fair comment to suggest that corrosion or whatever is down to their neglect. I spend a lot of time looking after my bikes. I don't see it as a chore, I enjoy doing it. I don't even trust tyre changing to anyone. It is a bit galling to have it implied (not by yourself) that because I didn't splatter the bike in anti-corrosion treatment I am somehow responsible. Whether you or others accept it, corrosion on chrome plated items after a short time is down to defective manufacture - nothing else. I've had my 1977 Suzuki for a few years - when I bought it, it had been lying against a shed under a tarpaulin for who knows how long? The brakes were seized solid, as was the chain. The whole thing looked like shit but after a good wash the chrome rims and zinc plated spokes showed zero corrosion. Yet, me and the other people who have had corrosion on split new 10 grand bikes are just downers on Triumph?

    Why don't you try your clocks - mine easily had 1.5mm completely free movement on their mountings. Not the give in the rubber mounting, but "rattle about" play.

    Try your seat - how well does it fit?

    Maybe I'm now looking for faults? Maybe if there hadn't been the corrosion issue I wouldn't even have noticed the other relatively minor things. Coming from an engineering/manufacturing background I find it fairly incomprehensible that these relatively minor faults made it into production. It would have cost no more to do it better.

    20140712_144624.jpg

    I wonder if my T120 will look this good in 2056?
     
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  3. Bonzo

    Bonzo Well-Known Member
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    Apr 29, 2016
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    Pasher, what was your dealers comment when you took the bike back for them to asses?
     
  4. Bikerman

    Bikerman Elite Member
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    Oct 29, 2014
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    Old git, love that 500, reminds me of my silver GT250, and my 2 GS 750's, oh how I wish I still had them ( Sorry this has gone off topic a bit )
     
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  5. littleade

    littleade The only sane one here
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    Mar 17, 2015
    3,396
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    kidderminster Worcestershire
    Not bad... it lasted to page 3. Not many threads do:D
     
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  6. MickEng

    MickEng Noble Member

    Sep 29, 2016
    1,939
    450
    West Yorkshire
    Nowt wrong with a good moan if you are genuinely aggrieved.
    I must admit I can never remember having to protect my bikes from the weather like I have to do with this Triumph. (30 year break from biking)
    Without a doubt the chrome and zinc plating is not as good a quality as bikes 30+ years ago, but I still love the bike and know I have to clean and protect it regularly.
    Your Suzuki 500 is top dollar, and yes you are right, if that is the original chrome and aluminium finish I cannot see the Triumph being like that in the same number of years.
    What I do remember though with the Jap bikes was the crankcase lacquers used to deteriorate and look shite and the monkey metal Philips drive screws used to round off.
     
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  7. andyc1

    andyc1 #2121313
    Subscriber

    Feb 4, 2017
    2,361
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    N. Ireland
    I cant see any modern bike being like that after so many years! Maybe its got more to do with the amount of recycled metal these days, its not just triumph, I'd still say they are one of the better ones! Ive never had any corrosion issues even on my tiger which I used all winter to commute to work... it had spoked wheels too but i did give it the occasional spray of ACF50.
     
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  8. pasher

    pasher Well-Known Member

    Sep 23, 2016
    123
    93
    Nottingham
    The back wheel with the rusty spokes has been replaced under warranty (front wheel spokes are ok so am hoping it was just a bad batch from the platers and the new will be ok). Have emailed them about the rust on the shocks saying I'll be taking it further when I'm back on the road and can ride there to show them. They acknowledged the email with an 'OK'.
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  9. Bonzo

    Bonzo Well-Known Member
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    Apr 29, 2016
    175
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    IoM
    Over the years Ive had 4 x K100RS's. My current one is a '90 16v with 'fixed' instrument pod (a Goretex breather), and yes, that still mists up to buggery. I have to say though BMW certainly engineered this to last. 27 years old and used in all weathers, with minimal pampering and it's still pretty damn good. Cant see many modern bikes holding out this well.

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. Trophy57

    Trophy57 Well-Known Member

    Jan 6, 2017
    32
    63
    Tasmania Australia
    Hey Bonzo

    That is a cool looking K100RS just love the black ;)
     
  11. Bonzo

    Bonzo Well-Known Member
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    Apr 29, 2016
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    Cheers Gary,

    Well, it used to be white (or as BMW called it - silver), but some numpty reversed into it in Sainsbury's carpark and so paid for repairs. As my previous K's were all black, that's the way I went.

    ...Anyway, strayed off topic again ;)
     
  12. littleade

    littleade The only sane one here
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    Mar 17, 2015
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    That unfortunately also includes B*W. They certainly don't make em like they used to.
     
  13. MrOrange

    MrOrange The Lunatics have definitely taken over !!!!
    Staff Member Subscriber

    Oct 28, 2015
    4,240
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    You'll probably find this is all down to the fact that they let accountants run manufacturing now, as opposed to engineers. They supply is down to who can give an acceptable product at the lowest price. Not who is going to supply the best quality and longest lasting item.

    Triumph will , like most bike manufacturers, buy in items such as shocks and wheels, these are supplied Just In Time (go look it up) to the factories ready for assembly, they don't spend time inspecting these items, but are just supplied and the producers relied upon to ensure the quality is at the correct level. Quality control inspections won't happen to every item bolted onto the bike. The suppliers are run by accountants, they want to make the item for the lowest price, so they get the contract and therefore make the most money. If you leave the shockbody in the chroming vat for 4 minutes instead of 5 minutes, they save production costs and therefore increase their profits.

    Back in the time of your old bikes being produced, engineers were in charge and a lot of production was done in house, so therefore manufacturers had greater control, but this was costly to do. Remember Triumph went out of business, BMW motorbikes were a whisper away from being closed.

    This system of manufacture was pushed by the Japanese, and to compete, the European manufacturers had to follow. So yes, your Triumph's are not as well made as they used to be. But that is the only way that Triumph can compete in the world market.

    R Orr (Hons) BEng Mme
     
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  14. old git

    old git Well-Known Member

    Jul 4, 2016
    203
    93
    Aberdeenshire, Scotland
    I read what you're saying Mr O and agree but if we just accept it then they'll sell us any old crap.

    Not all modern bikes are badly made. My Yamaha FJR1300 is a superb example of how to build quality into a motorcycle. 50,000 miles and other than servicing and an insatiable appetite for tyres the only thing to fail is a headlight bulb. The only corrosion is where the centre stand grounds.

    The Fireblade I sold to buy the T120 was IMO an engineering masterpiece and oozed quality.

    It's not all doom and gloom, there are some bikes from some manufacturers that are still well put together and can stand the test of time.
     
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  15. MickEng

    MickEng Noble Member

    Sep 29, 2016
    1,939
    450
    West Yorkshire
    Sounds like you're delving into Lean manufacturing there Mr O.
    False economy to make crap in any country or factory. It closes businesses!
    True lean manufacturing keeps costs down through the application and discipline of a continuous improvement philosophy, and should never be run by accountants.
    One part of lean is inventory management which if applied correctly will always keep the accountants happy (well as happy as an accountant can be) and out of your hair.
     
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  16. Jupiter

    Jupiter New Member

    May 10, 2017
    3
    3
    Somerset
    My 2017 T120 has corrosion on the sprocket cover and both wheel rims, despite frequent care with washing and PTFE spray. I was told by Triumph to rub the corrosion off with chrome polish, but this has ruined the brushed aluminium finish on the sprocket cover. Although I'm a fair-weather summer only rider surely a modern m/cycle should be able to be ridden as a daily commuter through the winter without corroding? Assuming a 9 to 5 job it's impossible to wash your bike everyday especially as such a commuter would only be at home during the dark hours. As I said, I don't ride in bad weather and look after my T120 and it's still corroding after less than a year. Triumph won't put this right under warranty. This isn't good enough! Car manufacturers wouldn't get away with it, why do we let the bike companies escape their responsibilities?
     
  17. Alain

    Alain New Member

    Jun 4, 2018
    0
    1
    France
    [QUOTE = "pasher, post: 97775, member: 5200"] Nettoyage rigoureux après chaque passage, polissage et enduction d'huile onéreuse = pas de rouille ni de corrosion. Eh bien, c'est assez évident !! Malheureusement, ce n'est pas ce pour quoi j'ai acheté le vélo. Oui, je nettoie le vélo, de la manière recommandée, toutes les deux semaines, et je pense toujours que la corrosion que je vois après 6 mois d'utilisation normale est inacceptable.
    J'ai reçu un e-mail de "sondage client" de la part de Triumph ce matin. Je l'ai rempli de notes plutôt positives, mais j'ai clairement exprimé mes sentiments à propos de ce problème. [/ QUOTE]
    Bonjour
     
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  18. Alain

    Alain New Member

    Jun 4, 2018
    0
    1
    France
    Bon
    Même probleme que vous scandaleux 2 mois pour avoir une reponse et garantie refusé

    15281845764722076753781.jpg
     
    • WTF WTF x 1
  19. Callumity

    Callumity Senior Member
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    Feb 25, 2017
    441
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    Nr Biggar
    Sometimes - and for the best of intentions - we all do things unadvisedly. Rust is the chemical process of oxidation. Salt and heat speed it up. A less than thorough clean after a ride out on salted roads and being snuggled up in a warm garage is unkind! Throw in spokes with nooks and crannies around rims and differing metals and you have mini anodes/cathodes electrolysing away......
    Our mistake? It can be as simple as having a coastal address!
     
  20. Alain

    Alain New Member

    Jun 4, 2018
    0
    1
    France
    Désolé mais la moto est lavé regulierement, c'est aTriumph de traiter le problème et non au client de ce preocuper des contitions climatiques.La moto est dans un box j'abite pas au bord de la mer. Vos moto son faite pour rouler que sous le soleil?
     
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