Featured Your Riding Gap

Discussion in 'Triumph General Discussion' started by Dennis Mcleroy, Feb 24, 2024.

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  1. David Cooper

    David Cooper Triumph Rocketeer.
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    Sandsend, north of Whitby, a really beautiful place.
    20190622_140221.jpg
     
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  2. R_1000

    R_1000 Elite Member
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    Super Cool Trike ;)

    I guess we all need to hang up our leathers one day. I genuinely wish much more years of riding for you. When you do give up the bike, I am sure you won't be sad because it's over but instead smiling because of all the beautiful joyful memories on your bike. You will always be a biker :heart:
     
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  3. Dawsy

    Dawsy Cumbrian half-wit
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    Hope you are being pessimistic @David Cooper and you can manage a few more years :grinning:
    Whatever happens though you have years of great memories and you will always have the spirit of a motorcyclist!
     
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  4. littleade

    littleade The only sane one here
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    I started in 1973 on my 17th Birthday but have had 3 breaks. 1st was 1987-1990, after getting divorced I couldn't afford to keep a bike. 2nd time was 2000 -2002 after selling my Fireblade after deciding I wanted to live and/or keep my licence. Last (to date) was 2009 - 2015, usual thing of kids, family and w*** leaving no time for biking. Now on my 4th bike since retiring :party:
     
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  5. Baza

    Baza Elite Member

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    Sorry to hear that David. Love the trike, a real beauty. As we get older we become more and more likely to be the unfortunate ones, health wise. This time last year I was diagnosed with prostate cancer. Fortunately we caught it early and hormone treatment and four weeks of radiotherapy sorted that bad boy in time for me to ride with two of my sons to an extended weekend in Wales in August. This year is already booked and looking for rideouts to plan. Next year my lads and I will have an opportunity to go to The Island for race week, travelling by helicopter! So my message to all is family must come first but you need to grab every opportunity as if were your last, because you never know. And one last thing, guys, don’t delay go and ask your GP for a PSA test soonest. As Steve Parrish says on the back of his autobiography “Don’t Die Wondering”.
     
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  6. Dawsy

    Dawsy Cumbrian half-wit
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    I asked my GP last year for a PSA test as I turned 60 in Dec and my dad has prostate cancer, she completely dismissed me saying they don't do it until 65! I will go back and insist.
     
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  7. littleade

    littleade The only sane one here
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    The PSA test by itself is not that accurate, which is probably why your GP is reluctant to get it done on it's own. It's more of an indicator than an actual black and white test as you can have high PSA levels, but not have cancer. He said the important bit is to monitor the PSA levels for change, nor necessarily the levels themselves and look at the results together with the DRE and lifestyle results

    https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/prostate-cancer/psa-testing/

    My GP does a number of tests for Prostrate as a package. This includes a lifestyle questionnaire (if it's in your family etc and how much you pee during the night etc), the DRE (not as bad as you think) and finally the PSA test. I had the package when I was about 61 so the 65 age limit must be a decision that practice/local health authority has made. Make an appointment and get it checked out.
     
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  8. Dawsy

    Dawsy Cumbrian half-wit
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    Cheers Ade. I knew the PSA wasn't the be all and end all, but thought something is better than nothing. I think the real reason they wouldn't do it is because the surgery is absolutely shocking these days :mad:
     
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  9. Rob the Scott

    Rob the Scott Active Member

    Dec 14, 2022
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    Great stories! Love the photos of the long list of bikes owned from Baza! The oldest photo reminds me of the photo I have here of my dad on his 1930's era Harley or Indian in riding leathers and a tie!

    Unlike most of you, although I got my license in 1980, I never bought or even rode a bike until 2018 (age 56). Prior to that, career, house, kids (and mortality) made it so I never even thought of a bike. In 2018, I bought my nephew's 2004 Speed Triple, intending to hold it for my son, who was still sorting out his first post-college job. When he bought it from me, I was so enamored that I found and bought a 2011 Sprint GT (pictured with my wife), and proceeded to put 17,000 miles on it, many of which were in the Utah and Colorado National Parks. This past September, I bought the 2013 Trophy SE for better wind protection and a more-comfortable riding position in preparation for some touring. I do still have the Sprint, as it is more agile than the Trophy. That said, the old Speed Triple was still closer to a sport bike and I envy those of you who have more-agile models!
     
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  10. littleade

    littleade The only sane one here
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    I might have been lucky then, I was seeing my GP for something else and asked him about PC as my mate had recently died from it after not getting his back ache checked out. He did it there and then, lifestyle Q&A first, followed by finger up the bum (his finger, my bum o_O) then as my lifestyle and FUTB exam were fine he booked me in for a PSA test that came back normal. He also said if I got concerned and wanted another it was no problem. His interest is in men's health though.
     
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  11. Dawsy

    Dawsy Cumbrian half-wit
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    Glad all is fine Ade. My old boss, who I contact at times went to an awareness day at Barrow rugby club. No symptoms at all but his PSA was 140+ , diagnosed with PC not long after. He is ok though.
     
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  12. Baza

    Baza Elite Member

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    #32 Baza, Mar 1, 2024
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2024
    Your GP needs the sack. Yes PSA levels can vary day to day depending on what you’ve been up to, nudge, nudge, wink, wink, say no more. With a family history that is disgraceful. But you can’t monitor it if you don’t test it in the first place.

    When I was working, due to the position I held and my age I had a full BUPA MoT every year which included the DRE so have known for years that I had an enlarged prostate. I didn’t retired until I was 70 and after another five SWMBO suggested that I get checked as the father of our son’s mate had been diagnosed and subsequently treated for it 18 months previously. That guy was obviously more advanced when they caught it because he has still not been given the all clear whereas I got the green light at the end of last year. I had 20 radiotherapy sessions he had 37 and is still on hormone treatment. So you need to tell your GP to pull her bloody finger out.

    There is a specific charity for this ailment, just click the hyperlink I’ve inserted. Very informative.

    The only way to definitely diagnose it is a biopsy which will probably be preceded by a MRI scan. There are two types of biopsy. The transperineal one allows access to more area of the prostate and doesn’t carry the infection risk that the trans-rectal one does. The only downside is it’s a general anaesthetic jobbie. I ended up having both in the end.

    The other screening I would recommend is for Abdominal aortic aneurysm. It’s an ultrasound exam, like pregnant mums have. If you are over 65 you can self refer. If it does burst they have 20 minutes to get you on the slab. Both of our fathers died of it.

    So don’t delay, get tested.
     
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  13. Dawsy

    Dawsy Cumbrian half-wit
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    Every time I visit the docs, which isn't often, I see a different doctor!
    My dad had an AA repaired in the 90's and really has needed another one for last five years or so but he is not fit enough to have the op. His brother died from one too. I have been checked once but mentioned it at the same time as the prostate check and got the same answer. Will make an appointment next week.
    Cheers for the link @Baza
     
  14. Pegscraper

    Pegscraper Elite Member

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    I mentioned a PSA test to my GP a few years ago, I think it was when Stephen Fry went public with his diagnosis and it was in the news. I had no symptoms and the GP more or less talked me out of it saying that high PSA levels can be caused by a number of factors not cancer related and the next step from a high PSA test result was a biopsy which is very unpleasant. I had the gloved finger check, also unpleasant:joy: and the result was OK. He did say that if he took a blood sample for a PSA test immediately after the examination it would come back higher than normal after the prostate has been poked and prodded. Much as I dislike anyone poking around in my anus I'm thinking of having another inspection. I've also just received a bowel test kit through the post which I'm told is routine every two years after you reach 60.

    Going back to the OP, no riding gap for me in 43 yrs on 2 wheels apart from a 15 year gap in green laning, during which the NERC act was passed which really fecked things up!:mad:
     
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  15. Baza

    Baza Elite Member

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    Again, with AA, family history plays a big part, almost exclusively a male problem. The surgeon that attempted to sew my dad back up asked me if I had been tested and said that if there is nothing untoward by the time you are 60 it is unlikely that it will occur in later years. I remember when father-in-law’s was discovered, purely by accident we had to wait for a whole year before it was at an operable size, about grapefruit size we were told. A year of anxiety for the whole family. The op he had to fix it gave him another ten years.

    The NHS does now have a screening program for this. But I started getting screened before this was in place. The way to go about this, suggested by my GP, who is a near neighbour, was for me to go to him and complain that I was getting these worrying abdominal pains that were most concerning. He would then refer me to outpatients at the hospital for an ultrasound examination, during which I would mention to the examiner that my father had died from an AA and would they be so kind as to have a quick Look at my aorta. I did this every two years until I was 60 and had the official NHS screening done.

    Be it PSA or AA Don’t take No for an answer.
     
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  16. Baza

    Baza Elite Member

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    Your GP was just scaremongering, a biopsy is not very unpleasant but I would rather be riding my bike. As for the PSA level being higher than normal after he’s stuck his finger up your jacksie, what a total pillock. Do the blood test before he fingers you. I have often wondered if the cost of any special procedures instructed by our GPs is, in some way, reflected in their budget entitlement.

    So what is higher PSA than normal? This is a direct quote from my oncologist to my GP 1 month after I finished my radiotherapy “his PSA was undetectable at less than 0.1 ug/L which is reassuring”. So the answer is there shouldn’t be any but as I’ve intimated earlier there are circumstances when it can be detected that are well known and harmless.

    If in any doubt seek advice from Prostate Cancer UK or Macmillan.

    Apologies for banging on about this but when you’ve been there you tend to see things differently.
     
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  17. Pegscraper

    Pegscraper Elite Member

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    He wasn't intending to do a blood test or advocating that one should be done after the examination, more the fact that things other than prostate cancer can cause a high PSA reading, as you mentioned in your earlier post. Apparently exercise, especially cycling can cause temporarily high PSA readings.
     
  18. Baza

    Baza Elite Member

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    Apologies for my misinterpretation of your earlier post but there should be absolutely no reason why your GP should refuse or try to persuade you not to undertake the blood test. The Prostate Cancer UK website says “it is freely available from your GP” and goes on to advise “1 in 8 men will get prostate cancer. If you’re over 50, or you’re black, or your dad or brother had it, you’re at even higher risk.”

    For those who may wonder how or why you “catch” cancer Gresham College a charitable trust that has been providing free public lectures on all manner of subjects since 1597 arranged this last month
     
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  19. littleade

    littleade The only sane one here
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    The AAA ultrasound screening is automatically offered to men in their 65th year now by the NHS. It only takes a few minutes and they told me my results there and then. You even get some KY gel spread on you for free ... You also get offered the once in a lifetime pneumonia jab too when your 65. Be silly not to have both
     
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  20. Baza

    Baza Elite Member

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    Also don’t forget the Shingles jab for all adults turning 65, those aged 70 to 79 and those aged 50 and over with a severely weakened immune system.

    This is a motorcycle forum isn’t it?:joy::joy::joy:
     
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