Featured The Good Old Day's Of Triumph Motorcycles.

Discussion in 'Triumph General Discussion' started by David Cooper, Dec 8, 2018.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. Alatamoc

    Alatamoc Active Member

    Mar 29, 2019
    242
    43
    Uk
    Remember those days well.
    Carrying a canvas bag full of tools every trip...stopping to replace the bits that had fallen off....bikes that refused to start once stopped. Pubs that refused to serve motorcyclists,
    Waterproofs that weren't.
    Ah, nostalgia... though of course its not like nostalgia used to be.
     
    • Funny Funny x 5
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 1
  2. Tigcraft

    Tigcraft Not Well Known Member
    Subscriber

    Mar 29, 2014
    2,204
    800
    Holmfirth West Yorkshire
    Trench coats that were wet, soggy old bike gloves, steamed up visors (if fitted) and that whoosh of cold water on every gear change!!
     
    • Funny Funny x 3
    • Agree Agree x 3
  3. Kenbro

    Kenbro Senior Member
    Subscriber

    Jul 9, 2019
    530
    243
    Manchester, UK
    Aye, built by hand....because they had no tools! ;).
    Ken.
     
    • Funny Funny x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Alatamoc

    Alatamoc Active Member

    Mar 29, 2019
    242
    43
    Uk
    Not sure any of my Meriden Triumphs or BSA's could truthfully be described as ' built to last.'
    Maybe ' built to be repaired so frequently that every part will soon be a new one' would be more accurate.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Funny Funny x 2
    • Useful Useful x 1
  5. Privateer

    Privateer Stand up member
    Subscriber

    Jan 2, 2017
    1,293
    1,000
    Derbyshire
    The new Triumphs don't even have the wonderful total loss oil system. Never having to change the oil as it was always fresh was wonderful!;);)
     
    • Funny Funny x 5
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Alatamoc

    Alatamoc Active Member

    Mar 29, 2019
    242
    43
    Uk
    My pre unit 6T had a remarkable total loss system...the rocker caps unscrewed themselves regularly...on one trip from South London to Cornwall all 4 caps came off on the M3/A303 section....my jeans were oil soaked by the time I noticed....still, looking on the bright side, I supposed they were at least now waterproof.
     
    • Like Like x 6
    • Useful Useful x 1
  7. Kenbro

    Kenbro Senior Member
    Subscriber

    Jul 9, 2019
    530
    243
    Manchester, UK
    From (Not very good) memory we used to drill the square, or was it hexagon bit on top of the covers then wire two together as the do with aircraft bits they don’t want unscrewing themselves.
    Ken.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. Kenbro

    Kenbro Senior Member
    Subscriber

    Jul 9, 2019
    530
    243
    Manchester, UK
    Brit. engineers were still working to thousandths of an inch, whereas the Japanese had a ruler that measured in Microns and they used it to good effect when building engines.
    They had damn good eyesight ;)
    Ken.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Tiglet

    Tiglet Vintage Member
    Subscriber

    Mar 28, 2016
    3,762
    1,000
    Cheshire
    And a lot of the model range had cast iron heads and barrels :eek:
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. Tigcraft

    Tigcraft Not Well Known Member
    Subscriber

    Mar 29, 2014
    2,204
    800
    Holmfirth West Yorkshire
    So where’s the weight come from then on our newer lighter bikes? It’s bizarre
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. Tiglet

    Tiglet Vintage Member
    Subscriber

    Mar 28, 2016
    3,762
    1,000
    Cheshire
    They also thought outside of the box when it came to design.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  12. Tiglet

    Tiglet Vintage Member
    Subscriber

    Mar 28, 2016
    3,762
    1,000
    Cheshire
    Possibly because there’s a lot more materials in modern day bikes.

    Cast wheels with twin discs up front,chunkier front forks etc.

    Wheels and therefore tyres are bigger so needing more air to fill them :laughing:
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Funny Funny x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. Tigcraft

    Tigcraft Not Well Known Member
    Subscriber

    Mar 29, 2014
    2,204
    800
    Holmfirth West Yorkshire
    @Tiglet its an interesting thought as to where and why the extra weight appeared. We’ve more plastic therefore lighter, have engines got heavier? They must have with extra gears and more cams etc. I suppose calliper and disc weigh more than drum brake? I know forks are heavier for a fact.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 2
  14. Tiglet

    Tiglet Vintage Member
    Subscriber

    Mar 28, 2016
    3,762
    1,000
    Cheshire
    Yes it’s a interesting subject Eric.

    I would have thought that a four cylinder crank would be heavier than a single or twin also.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  15. Tricky-Dicky

    Tricky-Dicky Elite Member

    Dec 12, 2016
    1,578
    700
    Norfolk UK
    More efficient engines make far more power these days so they dont worry about weight anymore...even a lardy old touring bike will do 160 without running out of breath.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 2
  16. Smilinjack

    Smilinjack Crème de la Crème

    Aug 14, 2016
    1,081
    1,000
    Nottingham
    They all finish up with a squint though :grinning:
     
    • Funny Funny x 3
    • Agree Agree x 1
  17. Kenbro

    Kenbro Senior Member
    Subscriber

    Jul 9, 2019
    530
    243
    Manchester, UK
    As evidenced by their racing motorcycle engines...5 cylinder 125!
    Ken.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  18. Tiglet

    Tiglet Vintage Member
    Subscriber

    Mar 28, 2016
    3,762
    1,000
    Cheshire
    Yes I saw RC149 raced by Irishman Ralph Bryan in 1967?
    If I remember correctly it had white exhaust system when I saw it.

    There were some truly exotic machines raced in those days,,,the RC166 Honda 250cc 6 cylinder, RC174 297cc (350) 6 cylinder and from Yamaha the RA31A V4 125 and the RD 05/A V4 250 to name just a few.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  19. Tiglet

    Tiglet Vintage Member
    Subscriber

    Mar 28, 2016
    3,762
    1,000
    Cheshire
    Had to do something similar with a 650 Triton in ‘67.
    The sweptback down pipes would blow off the cylinder head when giving it the berries so I drilled a hole in a fin on the finned clamps and a hole in a fin on the cylinder head and lock wired them in position.
    It worked :)
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Agree Agree x 1
  20. Kenbro

    Kenbro Senior Member
    Subscriber

    Jul 9, 2019
    530
    243
    Manchester, UK
    Tiglet,
    I feel privileged to have visited the TT races from ‘62 to ‘69 and I think that was the best era to have been there.
    I always had more interest in the 50s, and125s than anything bigger. Amazing engineering neverto be seen again.
    Ken.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
Loading...

Share This Page