Tents Moto Camping.

Discussion in 'Rideouts, Trackdays, Touring & Spotted' started by MoreT, Jun 14, 2022.

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  1. MoreT

    MoreT Senior Member

    Jun 12, 2022
    305
    113
    Hampshire
    Heated grips, heated anything.
    Call it Toxic Masculinity if you like but not while I live and breath.
    There's a great massive heatpump sitting between your legs.
    I have in the past carried two pairs of gloves. This also is a benefit in the case of damaging a pair. However over the duration of a trip the temperature doesn't change that drastically and have never needed to change them. Maybe different for continental riders going over long distances longitudinally.
    Only thing I carry is waterproof over gloves, They take little space. Even though all my gloves have gortex. Just so, once your wet your wet.
     
  2. MoreT

    MoreT Senior Member

    Jun 12, 2022
    305
    113
    Hampshire
    Riding gear.

    safety, practicality, comfort, style

    or in that sort of order.

    As a rule I have swapped out all of my armour for sas-tec level 2 low profile and all options are used including back and hips.

    Before riding HD I had a two piece leather and Gore-Tex Hein Gericke set up. It was awesome, but now it's not in keeping, I'm too fat and they have gone the way of most things. I've had loads of jackets and trousers over the years, even a full textile set that I used when commuting, its up in the loft and will be in the estate sale when I pop it. I don't want to have to carry it around when touring as it's bulky and uncomfortable when bimbling around the various places you visit that make the point of touring.
    I did go to the expense of buying a French textile jacket (Bering Norris) that seemed to have the style and flexibility for such a use but it failed on the application, despite some good reviews. The fit was a bit random. I had to buy a size extra to my usual and still the arms seemed to be designed for a pair of noodles. Also it didn't seem to be cut for riding and pinches around the shoulders when hands are on the grips. I wear it now as a casual jacket without the liner for autumn/spring bimbles but not riding.

    I also want to be able to daywalk in hills etc, so gear should be able to cover that. I have a goretex musto jacket that has given up the ghost this year. On a visit to the farmers market in Edinburgh we got caught in a downpoor and I later found the outer pockets had flooded. So far I'm ok with a decent fleece and a poncho. I carry my Oxford overjacket in case of real trouble but been good so far. All 3 of these items have multiple uses.

    As for jacket I always fall back on my Fox Creek Leather I had made to custom measurements when I was touring Florida fifteen years ago. Awsome jacket, I have come off while wearing it, I have worn it in the desert and near the Arctic Circle. It's the best bit of clothing I own. It has a removable liner and plenty of vents, I feed it every year. Even though it's a black jacket it has two reflective strips all around that aren't obvious in the daylight. Only draw back is it's not waterproof, hence the dayglo yellow oxford over jacket. This has been worn in extended torrential rain and performed great.

    I have looked at Merlin and Belstaff jackets but nothing fits or performs how I want it.
     
  3. MoreT

    MoreT Senior Member

    Jun 12, 2022
    305
    113
    Hampshire
    Boots...
    Needless to say over the decades I've had all sorts of boots. Some dedicated bike boots., others just good boots. Dedicated bike boots often have the safety features work boots don't have, like ankle armour. But saying that I have never found a motorcycle boot that has any sort of durability. They are generally good for one season and can only really perform as a bike boot.
    My daily ride boots are a pair of heavy engineers boots that come up to the top of my calf. Look good, are robust, cover the gap as my jeans ride up as they do when sitting on the bike, but not waterproof and not good for hill walking. I bought them because I used to have a similar pair made by HD that lasted for about 8 years, but I wasn't riding in the rain then. This iteration have been worn on a Scotland trip and ended up as a pair of foot spas on the return trip. I resorted to the old trick of two carrier bags.
    I have a pair of enduro boots (not my first) given as a Christmas present by the missus. Again good safety, look good, comfortable, but no good for walking and eventually let the rain in.
    On a tour I can carry two pairs only, my ride boots and a pair of sandals. The sandals are walking sandals though.
    This spring on a recommendation I bought a pair of Falco Rooster. They seemed good. ticked all the boxes, safety, waterproof, leather not plastic and Vibram sole.
    I must admit I was disappointed when they were delivered. They seemed too light, not a good sign on durability. and no Vibram sole, though they are supposed to be re-solable, haven't got to that point yet but yet to be determined. if so I will retro fit Vibram soles. Having worn them for a year now actually they are quite good. The waterproofing is good except for a small leak in the stitching just above the toe, however that takes a couple of hours of soaking rain to come to light. I don't polish them I use the same leather feed I use for the jacket. I do walk in them. I have a 12km hill walk locally I have used them on with good results. So one season past let's see if they survive next year.
     
  4. BATEBY45

    BATEBY45 Well-Known Member

    Apr 29, 2014
    619
    93
    I have camped for over 60 years, from pushbikes when at school with a simple two pole ridge to a Kyam megadome for two adults and two kids at the FIM rally in Hasselt in 1993. all on a Triumph Trophy and trailer with son and daughter on a Yam RD350.
    At the FIM in Lithuania in 2018 I surveyed all the tents used by entrants from across europe and settled on an Outwell Vigor 3 it is a two compartment unit with a sleeping area that would take 3 at a push but lots of room for me on my own. In the front area there is ample room for a folding table and chair, riding kit and panniers. With the front flap opened up on outside poles I can sit and read without getting wet in all but the monsoon rain.
    It is quite heay and takes 20 minutes to erect but is the best tent I have had, it's not an overnight tent but I have used it this year at the FIM Meritum in Andorra then the Rally in Zaragoza them the FIM motocamp in Lithiuania.
    Also used at weekend camping rallies in the UK .
     
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  5. MoreT

    MoreT Senior Member

    Jun 12, 2022
    305
    113
    Hampshire
    I have seen a little of Lithuania, though not on a bike. I visited Vilnius before C19 with my wife. I don't speak Lithuanian but I have a little Russian. This helps with the older people, much less with the younger. A beautiful city. The food and beer is well recommended, and great if you like amber jewelry. I would love to explore more especially as we didn't have time to visit Trakai Castle, though we did climb Gediminas’ Tower.

    Camping on pushbikes reminds me of a trip with my little brother back in the eighties. Two bikes and a canvas ridge pole tent from my dad. We rode 30 miles to Matlock, ran out of money and a goat ate all our food. Unfortunately we lost my little brother to the big C this year, and though he was deteriorating in health over the last decade and lost his sight we always made a commitment to camping out once a year. I made him a patch for my vest commemorating his years as an ice road trucker.
     
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  6. MoreT

    MoreT Senior Member

    Jun 12, 2022
    305
    113
    Hampshire
    Update.
    With the Black Friday deal I decided to spend £75. Instead of the Bivi I copped out and went for a smaller tent. I liked the video reviews I have seen of it, and though it is an inside up first tent the make and break camp times are much quicker and less fiddly. I'm hoping the mat will mean I can ditch the roll mat and keep everything inside the panniers. I'm still going to pack my 3/4 OEX mat, but it's small to pack, gives a little more padding for the hips and shoulders, and if one pops, I am always covered.

    Still going to go with the tarp option but will try using my poncho first, if that doesn't work out there are plenty of options.

    Phoxx 1 II.png

    Traverse 5 Sleeping Mat.png
     
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