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Discussion in 'Lounge' started by Judd Dredd, Nov 10, 2020.

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  1. Callumity

    Callumity Elite Member

    Feb 25, 2017
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    #181 Callumity, Dec 29, 2020
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2020
    They crossed....

    The WHO can only count on 30% of its funding. The remainder comes from paymasters who can direct how it is spent. Tedros was China’s preferred candidate and a biologist who strayed into health policy in Ethiopia’s Marxist Government rather than a clinician. The WHO has just redefined its previous definition of ‘herd immunity’ to exclude natural equilibrium and expressly promote vaccination. Most independent clinicians are pretty horrified at that and for obvious reasons. Go figure.

    When it comes to anomalies you have swallowed the gobbledygook of ‘asymptomatic’. Take out the pseudo medical and it means ‘well’. We are being persuaded (with various degrees of success) you can be well unwell and infectious. You might be brewing something and briefly infectious before being obviously symptomatic but respiratory infections are quite quickly damped by your immune system so you cough and splutter live virus less and less. However, the idea a positive PCR test, with no other symptoms, means you carry a live infection is a low order of probability. The test is simply not that accurate so 54k positives will reap a comfortingly small harvest of poor souls actually infected.

    Now THAT is strange.
     
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  2. figwold

    figwold First Class Member

    Dec 12, 2016
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    Is this even a sentence?
     
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  3. Callumity

    Callumity Elite Member

    Feb 25, 2017
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    And now you want punctuation?

    More specifically, 17-20% of those actually infected - which is a fraction of those testing positive (who are not actually infected at all because the PCR test can’t distinguish between active Covid and dead common cold cells killed by your immune system.)

    Strictly speaking a dependant clause......

    Here’s a pathologist to entertain you
    https://twitter.com/clarecraigpath/status/1317009997595922433?s=21
     
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  4. figwold

    figwold First Class Member

    Dec 12, 2016
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    No, just a verb would do ;)
     
  5. Callumity

    Callumity Elite Member

    Feb 25, 2017
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    Picky. You got a gerund.
     
  6. OldNick

    OldNick Elite Member
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    Aug 11, 2019
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  7. MARKYMARKTHREE

    MARKYMARKTHREE Senior Member

    Feb 11, 2020
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  8. Judd Dredd

    Judd Dredd Giver of Drugs, Vaccines and Hard Truths

    Jan 13, 2019
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    #188 Judd Dredd, Dec 30, 2020
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2021
    .
     
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  9. Sprinter

    Sprinter Kinigit

    Aug 17, 2014
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  10. tcbandituk

    Subscriber

    Apr 8, 2016
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    @Havit
    Any chance of sorting out the wheat from the chaff in this thread?
    :)
     
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  11. SleepyOwl

    SleepyOwl Crème de la Crème
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    Jul 26, 2019
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    I haven't read the whole thread but to anyone who is considering not having the vaccine, please make sure you discuss this with your other half and children. It is them who will be left without you.
    I'm sure my good friend who died last night would have jumped at the chance of having a vaccine, albeit too late for him. Dead within 10 days with no (known) underlying conditions at the age of 59.
     
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  12. Wessa

    Wessa Cruising
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    Apr 27, 2016
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    Depest sympathy to you and his family. You are correct this virus is not to be messed with.
     
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  13. littleade

    littleade The only sane one here
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    Mar 17, 2015
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    That's sad Brian, my sister in law died from it too at 56 though she did have underlying problems. One of the hardest things the family have had difficulty coming to terms with was how sudden it happened so I can understand how you feel.

    For those thinking of not having the vaccine, rather than just consider yourself also think of the vulnerable people who can't have the vaccine due to not being suitable for one medical reason or another as they are relying on you and everyone else to provide the herd immunity that will help protect them.
     
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  14. SleepyOwl

    SleepyOwl Crème de la Crème
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    So sorry to hear that Ade. My condolences to you and your family. It really is frightening how quick this can kill someone. We have all had occasion where we interpret the rules to fit our agenda but the time has definitely come to just follow the rules and save as many as we can.
     
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  15. pistonbroke

    pistonbroke Senior Member
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    Aug 10, 2020
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    Thank you for sharing the information, it’s very much appreciated. I’ve had my first jab on Tuesday.
     
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  16. littleade

    littleade The only sane one here
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    Mar 17, 2015
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    Thanks, it's an all too common occurrence I'm afraid. Our neighbors father died from it too in less than a week same as the SIL, it's really quite nasty. I bet there will be a few sore heads in Cornwall tomorrow now you've been bumped into Tier 3?
     
  17. Sandi T

    Sandi T It's ride o'clock somewhere!
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    Dec 3, 2018
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    @SleepyOwl and @littleade, my condolences on the losses of your friend and your sister-in-law. I know here are others on this forum who have also lost friends and loved ones, too. As Wessa said, this virus is nothing to be messed with. Mr. Sandi and I are eager to be vaccinated and tell anyone who tells us they aren't getting the vaccine or are going to wait and see that we'll take their place in line. We of course want to lessen the probability that we'll contract COVID but also to lessen the probability that we'll infect others.

    One of the things I've observed time and again as I've gotten older is a general belief among people that "bad things happen to 'other people', but not to me". A tragic car accident, cancer, death of a child, and...now in our faces everyday....COVID. I'm sure this way of thinking is somehow psychologically self-protective and serves our fundamental need for safety and security. But...we ARE the "other people".

    Since COVID hit I've observed this sort of thinking even more frequently. I've read about or heard about a number of people who thought this virus was no big deal or even a hoax but who changed their tune after they themselves became very ill or who had a friend and/or family member who died. When things become personal, perspectives change. I'm with you, SleepyOwl, the time has come (and is overdue in my opinion) "to just follow the rules and save as many as we can".
     
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  18. figwold

    figwold First Class Member

    Dec 12, 2016
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  19. figwold

    figwold First Class Member

    Dec 12, 2016
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    Cal might say it’s all made up, by the MSM, but those at the sharp end say otherwise:

    One of London’s biggest hospitals has warned it is on track to become virtually Covid-only amid a surge in cases in the capital that has left it scrambling to convert operating theatres, surgical recovery areas and stroke wards into intensive care units for the very sick.

    As the daily coronavirus case numbers in the UK continued an apparently inexorable rise, hitting a record 55,892, with 23,813 people in hospital and 964 reported deaths, the chief executive of University College London hospitals trust (UCLH), Prof Marcel Levi, said admissions were already spiralling beyond the first wave in the spring.

    Every hospital in London was facing the same demands on beds and staff, and University College hospital was taking admissions from other hospitals that were less well able to cope, he told the Guardian.

    “This is much more than we had in March and April,” said Levi, an acute medicine doctor. The 500-bed hospital has 220 Covid patients, with the numbers increasing by 5% a day, but the real pressure is on intensive care where there are now 70 very sick patients, as there were in the spring, and the number is rising fast.

    “Usually in our ITU we have about 35 patients so we are already doubled in size at UCLH. We are further surging upon the request of London to 92 patients in the next week, and thereafter probably we will have to grow even further,” he said.

    Doctors in England despair over disregard for Covid restrictions

    At the hospital, whole floors are having to be dismantled and rebuilt to the standards required for intensive care wards. As they did in March, they have had to convert five floors and equip them with oxygen and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines that help people breathe.

    It came as a nearby hospital reportedly told staff it was in “disaster medicine mode”. The Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel, east London, has more than 90 patients in adult critical care units and the “number of people with Covid continues to rise rapidly”, according to an email sent to staff. It adds: “We would like to take this opportunity to reiterate the fact we are now in disaster medicine mode. We are no longer providing high standard critical care, because we cannot. While this is far from ideal, it’s the way things are, and the way they have to be for now.”

    Just under half of all major hospital trusts in England – 64 out of 140 – have more Covid-19 patients than at the peak of the first wave of the virus. This includes 11 of the 14 acute trusts in eastern England and 12 of the 19 acute trusts in south-east England. The NHS said on Thursday it was making sure the Nightingale hospitals were “reactivated and ready to admit patients”.

    Levi paid tribute to his “amazing” staff, who volunteered to give up their leave over Christmas and the new year to help save lives. But they are severely stretched: intensive care nurses normally work with one patient; now they may have four or five under their care.

    Elaine Thorpe, a critical care matron at the hospital, said they set up 20 new intensive care beds on Christmas Eve that were full by New Year’s Eve. “The biggest thing for me is I’m dreadfully worried about my team. Nurses are having to spread themselves thinly. We’re going back to the levels where we were before, where it was one ICU nurse looking after what will be four patients, or more. And we’ve had lots of tears already.

    “This is happening all over London. UCLH is not quite feeling it the way that the other hospitals are, but a little stretch on an ICU nurse is too much of a stretch and you know we’re already doing way beyond what we would not want to do. And they’re just terrified as well. We’re living it again already.”

    The tears are partly because nurses are unable to give their patients the dedicated care they want to provide, as well as the distress that Covid inflicts on everyone. Thorpe tells of nurses listening to families at home pouring out their hearts via iPads to severely ill relatives in ICU, who may be able to hear but cannot reply.

    But there are also tears of frustration that people are still taking risks with the virus. “It’s not about us not stepping up and doing our job. We’ve all sacrificed Christmas and New Year but it’s not about that. We’re here for the patients. But it’s in the hands of the public to stop this, and it’s not listening and tonight [New Year’s Eve] is obviously going to make things even worse,” she said.

    She has seen high-profile people on Twitter claiming that hospitals and intensive care units are empty. “I just don’t understand and my team don’t understand it, and that’s the really hard thing,” she said.

    We were almost there, she said, with vaccines on the way. If people had given up Christmas and new year, it could have been different, she said, but now “this is going to be weeks. None of us can see this stopping any time soon.”

    Cue Cal claiming the hospitals are no busier than normal and that there are still empty beds so it’s all nonsense.
     
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  20. DCS222

    DCS222 Guest

    @Judd Dredd - what do you make of the suggestion that people that have had the first Pfizer vaccine don’t get their second jab until 12 weeks to allow more folk get the first jab...
     
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