Speed Triple Engine Installation

Discussion in 'Technical Help' started by Speedy Pete, Jan 23, 2023.

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  1. Speedy Pete

    Speedy Pete Well-Known Member

    Feb 1, 2019
    85
    78
    Kent
    Does anyone have any tips for refitting a 2010 Speed triple engine?
    I have recently had a major gearbox failure and had to drop the engine to repair it.( I think that the previous owner liked clutch less changes).
    Now that the repair is done, I'm having issues refitting it.
    Here are few pictures of the gearbox if you are interested.
    It's really annoying as I always have mechanical sympathy for my bikes.

    IMG_20221224_155814289.jpg

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    IMG_20221224_155912541.jpg

    IMG_20221224_155804666.jpg

    IMG_20221224_155850561.jpg
     
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  2. TRIPLE X

    TRIPLE X Senior Member

    Sep 1, 2021
    266
    113
    Downham Market, Norfolk
    Is it the gearbox install or refitting the engine to the frame? If it's the engine it's important to make sure the shims are replaced between the engine and frame on the right hand side. There is a bolt tightening sequence and the left side is done first before shimming and tightening the right side. A service manual is essential for the torque values and tightening sequence.
     
  3. Speedy Pete

    Speedy Pete Well-Known Member

    Feb 1, 2019
    85
    78
    Kent
    It's actually more basic than that, my issue is lining up the engine mounts , I have managed to get the rear bolts in loosely, but when I jack up the engine, the cam cover doesn't clear the front frame mounts, and if you mount the front first, the rear mounts foul on the frame where it narrows for the drag link.
    The manual says place on jack and line up mounts, easier said than done.

    You are spot on about the tightening sequence, I thought this would be easy after the gearbox, plus I got it out so it must go in!
     
  4. TRIPLE X

    TRIPLE X Senior Member

    Sep 1, 2021
    266
    113
    Downham Market, Norfolk
    I take it the engine came out with the cam cover on?
     
  5. Speedy Pete

    Speedy Pete Well-Known Member

    Feb 1, 2019
    85
    78
    Kent
    Yes, I released all the bolts after loosening the swinging arm and drag link as per manual.
    The engine did hang up at the rear on the recess in the swinging arm, and had to be pulled forward, before dropping down.
    with this in mind I have tried the reverse of this (As per all good manuals) but without success.
    Possibly with a couple more people it should be possible to get it back in.
    A close eye is needed on the exhaust mounting bracket on the right, as it can easily damage the crankcase at the back of the clutch.
    I was hoping somebody may have a tried and tested technique before I struggle on.
     
  6. Speedy Pete

    Speedy Pete Well-Known Member

    Feb 1, 2019
    85
    78
    Kent
    It looks easy, but I really need a box of sky hooks

    IMG_20230122_122434992.jpg

    IMG_20230122_122434992.jpg

    IMG_20230122_122427154.jpg
     
  7. TRIPLE X

    TRIPLE X Senior Member

    Sep 1, 2021
    266
    113
    Downham Market, Norfolk
    Not had the engine out myself so can't offer first hand experience but I'm sure someone has and will respond with advice. Everything always seems to be a tight fit so it might be just a case of ensuring the engine is level on the jack and lifted uniformly.
     
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  8. sprintdave

    sprintdave Nurse,he's out of bed again

    May 25, 2014
    1,496
    750
    Birmingham
    By the sound of it you need to jack the engine up level, not one end first.
     
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  9. Speedy Pete

    Speedy Pete Well-Known Member

    Feb 1, 2019
    85
    78
    Kent
    Yes, you would think, but I have tried that, and both ends foul.
    My next move, when I have some extra muscle on Friday, is to lift the engine with the exhaust ports almost vertical, then once the front mounts are past the frame turn it toward the front of the bike and lower it down into position from above.
    I will report back at the weekend how it went.

    On the plus side, while the engine was out, I have done the 12k valve check and shim with great ease ;)

    The exhaust were spot on at 0.25 but a couple of the inlet were 0.11 so I have re-shimmed then to the upper tolerance.
     
  10. TRIPLE X

    TRIPLE X Senior Member

    Sep 1, 2021
    266
    113
    Downham Market, Norfolk
    Yes, simple job to do the valve check with the engine out. Not so easy with the engine insitu trying to get the damn cam cover off with minimal clearance :mad:. Sounds like it is going to be a 2 person job to get the motor back in !
     
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  11. sprintdave

    sprintdave Nurse,he's out of bed again

    May 25, 2014
    1,496
    750
    Birmingham
    Mmmm. What I don't understand is that you managed to drop the engine out in the first place. Surely if it came out OK it must go back the same?
    Very strange.
     
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  12. Speedy Pete

    Speedy Pete Well-Known Member

    Feb 1, 2019
    85
    78
    Kent
    Yes I agree it's a strange one, when I removed it, I had a jack underneath it, removed all the bolts, lowered the jack and it stayed in place!
    So a lot of pushing and pulling ensued, it appeared to be caught in the recess at the front of the swinging arm, eventually it dropped down.
    I think that because the bike was on the floor held up by an Abba stand, it was that bit higher allowing more of angle on the engine.
    Now on the bike lift with paddock stand it's a bit lower, meaning there is not enough height to turn the engine before it hits the frame.
    Going to try and man handle it in on Friday without the jack underneath, so as to give more height. (With the help of a couple of friends)
     
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  13. Alan Gilbert

    Alan Gilbert Senior Member

    Nov 22, 2018
    302
    113
    Lincolnshire, UK
    looking at your pictures, One solution might be to angle the front of the engine up at say 45 degrees, slide it rearwards as much as you can and then raise the front so that the front engine frame mounts don't foul the cam cover and slide them more or less in to postion but then raise the front of the engine still further which should allow it to be slid forwards a little more so that when the rear is lifted, it clears the narrowing for the drag link. Now slide the engine rearwards slightly until front and back line up?
    This would need adjustable straps front and rear and a really stable platform. In order to get sufficient angle on the engine, you might need the bike raised "off the deck" a little more so that you have more working space under the frame.
    I think you are right, plenty of additional muscle and someone ready to slip the bolts in is probably the way forward.
    Try and work out an action plan before lifting because attempting to force it won't be the solution.
    Do post and let us know the answer as I'm sure it will benefit others.
    Your pictures speak a thousand words - all those peeps who engage in clutchless changes and are convinced it does not damage, take heed!!
    Selector forks normally show signs of abuse after clutchless use.
     
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  14. Speedy Pete

    Speedy Pete Well-Known Member

    Feb 1, 2019
    85
    78
    Kent
    I agree totally with your plan, I was hoping to report on how it went, but had to postpone fitting till Tuesday afternoon. (Tomorrow)
    I am planning on using screw drivers instead of the bolts initially for speed if we are lifting by hand, then once in place (Fingers crossed) follow the correct sequence with the bolts and shims etc.
     
  15. Speedy Pete

    Speedy Pete Well-Known Member

    Feb 1, 2019
    85
    78
    Kent
    :)Happy to report that from about 20 minutes ago the engine is back in !!!!!

    I thought that I would quickly write up what happened while it's fresh in my mind, so as it may help someone else in the future.

    The main lessons are..........

    You need three people, two reasonably strong.

    With the bike on the ground or bike lift and using a rear paddock stand.

    Place the engine on the floor or bike lift platform with just foam kneeling mat for protection underneath.

    There is not enough room for the smallest of jacks or scissor lifts at this stage. (You won't get the engine to the required angle)

    The engine then needs to be tilted back, so that the front engine mounts are at 11 o'clock.
    Then with a person each side, lift the engine toward the front mounts, noting that the engine mounts are offset and both go to the right of the frame fixing points.
    At the same time the third person places old Philips type screw drivers through the bolt holes and a jack or wooden block under the engine.

    The screwdrivers are important because the go in quickly and give you wiggle room.

    Now with a jack underneath, start to raise the rear of the engine, you will find it starts to just foul on the lower part of the frame near the drag link mounting, this is where the screwdrivers instead of bolts in the front mounts are a blessing, as they are half a bolt diameter thinner the engine can be pulled forward by the two people as the third winds the jack up just missing the frame.
    NOTE ! The person on the jack also needs to put the chain over the output shaft, before the engine is fully up! And rear screwdrivers in.

    Now replace the screwdrivers with bolts on the righthand side first, this is the side with the shims, being just on the screw drivers you can move the engine left a little to get the shims in, you may need to let the weight off the jack for this, and then bring it back into play for aligning the holes, we also had to push the engine back a bit.
    On the righthand side the lower rear bolt has a spacer about 4mm thick between engine and frame, I found it too tight a fit to just push in, even though the lower drag link bolt was fully slack as per manual, but with a very gentle use of a small pry bar it slid in nicely.
    The rest of the bolts just slid right in.

    Time for a cold beer !

    Then return with the torque wrench and tighten in sequence as per manual.

    I hope that all make sense, and is helpful.

    I think where I went wrong was trying to start with engine on the jack, and doing it on my own.

    You MUST have 3 people AND use screwdrivers instead of bolts to start with (Obviously not cheap bendy ones) screwdrivers not friends that is.:)
     
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  16. TRIPLE X

    TRIPLE X Senior Member

    Sep 1, 2021
    266
    113
    Downham Market, Norfolk
    It's never as easy as the manual suggests. I hope I never have to remove mine but now I know how it goes back in. Well done, job's a good'n.
     
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  17. sprintdave

    sprintdave Nurse,he's out of bed again

    May 25, 2014
    1,496
    750
    Birmingham
    Well done. We all know where to come if we need our engines dropping out now.
     
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