Featured Resurrecting 1966 Tiger T100ss

Discussion in 'Builds & Projects' started by DaveQ, Aug 14, 2022.

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  1. DaveQ

    DaveQ Well-Known Member

    Jul 28, 2022
    57
    68
    Surrey. England
    Hi there

    Some years ago I bought a 1966 Tiger T100ss from a colleague at work as a sort of, retirement project. It had been his sister’s bike which he had started reconditioning but the job had stalled and was still in a fully stripped condition. But, he had assured me, that it was ‘mostly there’. I did do a quick check at the time and it seemed to be pretty much complete.

    I have owned Triumphs before and still have a T120, all in one piece, which I was riding regularly around that time. That involved all the usual maintanance stuff to it but I had never got involved with anything quite as heady as a full strip.

    I’ve always had a bit of a ‘thing’ about the T100ss. I suppose mainly because of the bikini fairing panelwork which I still think is extremely stylish. I just think that it’s one of the most beautiful of Triumph’s bikes which probably stems from the fact that my first motor cycle was a ‘61 Tiger cub which had the same sort of panels. So I decided to take it on.

    Well, I’ve just finished the sort through the pile of boxes and bags that are supposed to contain the ‘mostly complete’ T100, and it is indeed ‘mostly’ there. There are of course bits missing and many of the others are in a sorry state. On the other hand, I find that I’ve got rather more bits of some components than are required on one bike. Frinstance, there are 5 pistons, about 15 engine pushrods and around 20 clutch plates. I also have 3 front brake hubs from three separate periods of Triumph development and a complete set of front forks of uncertain parentage as well as the bits that I assume are the original.

    There are a couple of major (to me) problems that I’m going to have to find a way of tackling before I get into the rest of the refurb expenses. The first is that one of the missing parts is the centre stand. That probably disappeared on the road somewhere when the R/H mounting lug on the frame got broken. I can source a new stand but the lug repair is part of a cast iron(?) bracket and probably beyond my skills to weld in new or repair.

    Anyway, subject to sorting that as a problem and inspired by some of the beautiful restorations listed in these pages I will be giving it a try.

    Dave

    photos to follow when I’ve figured out how.
     
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  2. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

    Oct 26, 2015
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    When you have sorted a stand any good welder fabricator should be able to sort out the broken off lug, enjoy the restoration.
     
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  3. DaveQ

    DaveQ Well-Known Member

    Jul 28, 2022
    57
    68
    Surrey. England
    Thanks darkman for your note and the encouragement. I’ve know of a small local engineering shop that might be able to do the job but I have yet to get the stand. Probably go see them when it’s to hand.

    Here’s some of ‘the pile’. The engine is in another couple of boxes. Last one is the frame centre stand… or at least where it should be.

    Dave

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  4. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

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  5. DaveQ

    DaveQ Well-Known Member

    Jul 28, 2022
    57
    68
    Surrey. England
    Thanks for that. I thought they weren’t Triumph but I couldn’t identify what they were. They don’t have the capping piece that holds the hub spindle at the bottom of the staunchons. It’s got a pinch bolt arrangement instead, which is broken. I think the previous owner might have been intending to graft that whole set onto the frame to get the advantage of a ‘better’ brake.

    Dave
     
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  6. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

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    The alloy brake drum is Triumph from an oil in frame 650 and was affectionally known as the comical brake as its so poor :) a Norton twin leading shoe would work better or just fit the correct forks and brake for a 66 for originality.
     
  7. DaveQ

    DaveQ Well-Known Member

    Jul 28, 2022
    57
    68
    Surrey. England
    I’ve finally bitten the bullet and kicked off the whole thing by ordering a new centre stand and fittings for the bike which could be with me next week. Once those are to hand I’ll be approaching a reasonably local engineering business that I know of to have the welding repair carried out. Although I have welded before I fear that the repair is probably well beyond my expertise. Anyway it’s a start.

    Partly in preparation for this undertaking I’ve also ordered up a lightweight compressor to hopefully provide a source of an air jet to help clean out all those little nooks and crannies that get blocked with the crud from years of inactivity. It also has a facility for a spray gun but I’m not sure if it’s going to be man enough for that job. I hope it should at least cope with repainting the ancillary bits like footrests and brackets with the universal black.

    The next decision is on the front forks. On closer inspection it seems that just prior to stripping, the forks and front wheel that were actually in use was the conglomeration of Norton Roadholder forks, Triumph conical hub and brake, all laced into a Triumph wheel. This is not a combination that I’d like to try to keep on the bike. Luckily, I do also have most of the bits of the original forks and brake hub, which although they are mostly in poor condition, it would probably be the easier route.

    Dave
     
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  8. Dawsy

    Dawsy Cumbrian half-wit
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    Aug 24, 2018
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    Good luck Dave. No shortage of excellent advice from knowledgeable types on here:grinning:
     
  9. DaveQ

    DaveQ Well-Known Member

    Jul 28, 2022
    57
    68
    Surrey. England
    Many thanks Dawsy. I’ll probably need all the help I can get. :)
     
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  10. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

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    On a good note you have the original hard to find yokes in the first pic :)
     
  11. DaveQ

    DaveQ Well-Known Member

    Jul 28, 2022
    57
    68
    Surrey. England
    I do seem to have a surfeit of headstocks. I picked the one with the best looking paintwork of the bunch as most likely to use. On looking a bit closer I realised the spigot of the other one has a milled slot in it, which I presume is to engage a removable steering lock. The first choice one doesn’t have the slot.

    Having said that, I’ve been looking at the possibility of incorporating the twin l/shoe brake hub that I’ve also got into the job. I know it’s an effective brake because the one on my T120 stopped that bike quite adequately and they can be seen on later T100’s. The 2ls hub seems to locate in the existing sliders ok, but I realise it would need wider yokes for the width of the hub. Then there’s no telling what other problems arise from that.

    I also found that the chromed front wheel rim is possibly the original. Using the details you mentioned in another post I think it matches the details for a front 18” wheel. It’s also got the number W1373 stamped in which from the parts list shows it as a ‘Front wheel rim (WM2-18)’. I’m going to get the rim separated from the forks to see if it’s a candidate for rechroming.

    So, for the moment I’ll probably proceed by trying to get the original forks and brake hub sorted and put the 2ls brake on the back burner for the time being. I’m afraid the comedy brake hub and Norton forks are not going to make it to the final selection as that’s a bit too much like a ‘Bitza’

    Dave

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  12. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

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    As you have a full width hub and TLS brake you wish to use just fit the narrow axle from a 66-67 Triumph and shave the fork and brake plate a little and the later TLS will fit :) Black top yoke is correct and the other bottom yoke with slot is correct having the fitting on your frame for the accessory steering lock.
     
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  13. DaveQ

    DaveQ Well-Known Member

    Jul 28, 2022
    57
    68
    Surrey. England
    Thank you for the pointers darkman. That sounds like a great option. I think if I could incorporate the tls brake it would be a worthwhile improvement. Apart from anything else there weren’t actually any brake parts inside the original sis hub when I opened it. In the meantime I’ll see what I can do with the forks.

    I got the first part in today. The Centre stand. A quick turnaround of just three days from the supplier which was pretty good I thought. As now seems usual there was a variety of points to help match up the correct part. With three choices of different stands for different year builds, but almost indistinguishable between them, the main criteria was the wheel size of 18 inches in my case. Offered up to the bike it snuggles in beautifully. All I’ve got to do now is to arrange for something to hang it on.

    This morning I collected the previously ordered portable compressor. Had a look around the shop while I was there and came away with a new ‘third hand’ that was on offer. Oh the joys of Machine Mart. So far I think I’ve spent as much on tools as on the bike.

    Dave
     
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  14. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

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    On the subject of wheel rims if you use an 18" rear and 19" front like other models you have a better choice of tyres as in period correct Avon or Dunlop K70's.
     
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  15. DaveQ

    DaveQ Well-Known Member

    Jul 28, 2022
    57
    68
    Surrey. England
    I’ve spent a fun morning disconnecting Norton forks, Triumph brake hub and Dunlop tyre from the front wheel rim to see if the rim is reusable. Apart from a bit of rust between the spoke holes it seems to be in fairly good condition, so its the first item into the ‘to be re-chromed’ box. It’s the only wheel I’ve got in the pile so I’m probably going to have to go for a new rear one. There’s a number stamped into the rim which apparently shows it to be a front wheel. I assume that’s because it doesn’t have a security bolt hole.

    Weirdly, the tyre that’s just come off is a Dunlop Roadmaster TT100 360 H 18 that is clearly embossed in the wall ‘Rear Tyre’. I thought that it looked a bit industrial for a front tyre that should be ribbed. Nevertheless, It is in rather better condition than I thought it would be, but it’s still too stiff and old to use.

    Dave

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  16. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

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    What make of tyre are you planning on using on the 18" front rim out of interest.
     
  17. DaveQ

    DaveQ Well-Known Member

    Jul 28, 2022
    57
    68
    Surrey. England
    Hi. Well I’d like to keep it to the standard Dunlop or Avon as mentioned. I’ve skimmed the suppliers that I can find and 18” in any make seem to be thin on the ground. ( non existent), and as I’m sure you know, it’s supposed to be a ribbed.

    I can go with 19” at the front and that might be more in keeping with the Tls brake. But I don’t really know enough and thought it easiest to keep it to the standard as far as possible and leave the changes till afterwards.

    Dave
     
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  18. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

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    Save money and go 19 front 18 rear now :) then you can have Avon or Dunlop :)
     
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  19. DaveQ

    DaveQ Well-Known Member

    Jul 28, 2022
    57
    68
    Surrey. England
    Okay, thanks I’ll take your advice.

    What would be the reason for manufacturers fitting different sized wheels anyway? Was it just handling?

    Dave
     
  20. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

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    My guess is BSA simplifying and cost cutting buying in parts as the so often did.
     
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