Puncture Today, Help Please

Discussion in 'Bonneville' started by toffeeboy, Jun 8, 2021.

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  1. toffeeboy

    toffeeboy Active Member

    Jul 21, 2016
    26
    28
    cheshire
    Thanks for the kind offer, I'm actually hoping to get it sorted today or tomorrow, I've been in work since Thursday so apologies for the lack of responses to all your helpful posts, top work guys
     
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  2. nickjaxe

    nickjaxe Active Member

    Sep 2, 2020
    47
    28
    Cheshire UK
     
  3. nickjaxe

    nickjaxe Active Member

    Sep 2, 2020
    47
    28
    Cheshire UK
    How long does it take to look pressure.....if its very slow......you could pump it up.....ride it to your nearest repair shop.


    only a few weeks ago bought a real small 12v compressor from B&M here in the UK...£10.....takes no room up in my bike bag.....hopefully if a get a puncher it will be slow....so I can pump it up and get home....if not to far away.

    I would then fix it at home.....but anybody that is not confident should not attempt wheel repairs.
     
  4. Steve T.

    Steve T. Active Member

    Dec 6, 2020
    202
    33
    Northern British Columbia
    Depends if the tires are tubed or tubeless! My T120 is tubed but I usually carry a mini inflator (12V SAE) {MotoPumps Mini Pro Inflator - seems accurate} …& at least I could help others... It's pretty pointless carrying this gear for myself... unless you have the tyre levers, patch kit, etc. to make field repairs - never mind being able to break the bead!
    In the past I've had to do field repairs and, yup, I damaged the rim (outer flange)… but we got home!
    After +45 yrs I've only had a few flats - one tubeless and a couple of tubed!
    Tubes are a PITA …the tubeless can be plugged (I usually carry some of these as well... to help others:))
     
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  5. toffeeboy

    toffeeboy Active Member

    Jul 21, 2016
    26
    28
    cheshire
    yep I much prefer tubeless tyres but the cost of changing the rims is phenomenal!
     
  6. Herry00

    Herry00 New Member

    Dec 27, 2022
    0
    1
    Vallecito, CA
    When you get a puncture with tubeless tires, you won't go to the store; you can fix them at home by using a rubber tire plug. First, you must locate the damaged area. Then Pick a rubber tire plug roughly the same size as your puncture. Carefully thread the plug tool into your applicator fork until you reach the middle, with each end approximately the same length. After threading, insert your tool into the hole, but be careful not to slip the whole plug tool inside your tubeless tire. Twist and swiftly remove the tool.
     
  7. nickjaxe

    nickjaxe Active Member

    Sep 2, 2020
    47
    28
    Cheshire UK
    Thought that idea was a temp fix just to get you home...I would always want a patch on the inside of the tyre.

    Reading back over these posts....I see people saying use long levers as lots of leverage is needed.

    Honest there should be no need for any force to get a tyre off a rim.....if force is needed your doing it wrong.

    The opposite side of the tyre you guys are trying to pull over the rim edge needs to be deep in the well of the wheel to allow enough gap to get the tyre over the rime edge.

    I do all my own tyre work....4x4 car and motor cycle....my 4x4 tyres I need 2ft long levers.....way to long for a bike.....
     
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