Puncture Today, Help Please

Discussion in 'Bonneville' started by toffeeboy, Jun 8, 2021.

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  1. toffeeboy

    toffeeboy Active Member

    Jul 21, 2016
    26
    28
    cheshire
    Managed to pick up a screw right in the middle of the middle of the rear tyre on my T120

    Any advice on how I can fix it so I can get it to a tyre place to get a new tube, it’s a tubed tyre? Can I put some Goop in or is it too late for that? Also what are the best tunes to use?

    Also is there any cost effective way to change to tubeless tyres? I’ve seen a link to the airtight site, has anybody used this system and is it reliable?
     
  2. Pegscraper

    Pegscraper Elite Member

    Jun 12, 2020
    2,153
    800
    Yorkshire
    The tyre goo is meant for tubeless tyres. I've never used it in either but I can"t see it working in a tube. The wall of a tube has very little strength and the hole will just stretch allowing the goo out, unlike the tyre carcass which is comparatively very strong. I've seen the airtight system but I'm not a fan. Personally, if I was that bothered about going tubeless, I'd pay the £££ and get some tubeless rims. Changing a tube isn't that difficult if you get a set of correctly sized tyre levers. Loads of videos on YooTube showing how. If you stick with tubed wheels, look into getting a HD 4mm tube. They're not available in all sizes but worth the money if they are IMO.
     
  3. Samsgrandad

    Samsgrandad Senior Member

    Dec 15, 2019
    470
    113
    Somerset
    The makers of Goop claim that it can be used in both tubed and tubeless tyres but state that it should be used before you get a puncture. I don't know whether it would work after the event!

    Also there are different opinions on this type of sealant, whether it affects the wheel balance and whether it is effective. The only experience I have had with it is at shows where the demonstration wheel has more holes in it than a second hand dart board!
     
  4. toffeeboy

    toffeeboy Active Member

    Jul 21, 2016
    26
    28
    cheshire
    I tried to find a mobile tyre fitting service but I couldn't find one serving the Lancashire area, if you know of one please let me know
     
  5. andypandy

    andypandy Elite Member

    Jan 10, 2016
    3,867
    800
    Shaw
    Take the wheel off and take it to a tyre fitter.
     
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  6. SpeedTwin1200

    SpeedTwin1200 Well-Known Member

    Jul 21, 2019
    248
    93
    Hampshire
    Failing that, if you have some sort of recovery membership, AA, RAC, Triumph etc. you could get it collected. I had to do that once with a week-old Ducati as I couldn't patch a tubeless puncture at the time, didn't have the big socket required to pull the wheel off and I had some sort of Ducati card in my wallet. Seeing my bike on the back of a massive flat bed, just for a flat tyre was somewhat humiliating, but it got it fixed.

    I'd rather "Take the wheel off and take it to a tyre fitter" than suffer that again. Even if you've never taken the wheel off before, it may be the simplest/quickest solution.
     
  7. Wessa

    Wessa Cruising

    Apr 27, 2016
    10,541
    1,000
    North West England
    I agree with previous post, either remove the wheel and take it to the tyre shop or if you have a recovery service use them to take your bike.. If you don’t fancy taking the wheel off buy a recovery service, leave it a couple weeks and then ring them.
     
  8. Yorkshireman

    Yorkshireman Crème de la Crème
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    Dec 12, 2015
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    I was changing tubes and mending punctures when I was ten years old, it’s just a bit bigger job on a motorbike tyre, can’t believe it’s beyond him.
     
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  9. andypandy

    andypandy Elite Member

    Jan 10, 2016
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    Shaw
    Do you need help off a forum member ?
     
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  10. Steve T.

    Steve T. Active Member

    Dec 6, 2020
    188
    33
    Northern British Columbia
    My recent flat rear tire (T120) I needed to borrow a bead breaker and "longer" levers and not everyone has access to these. Tubed tyres on the T120 was a big "off" for me…but I still bought one!
    As for bicycles, two spoons from mum's kitchen always worked well...

    As for help?
    You get your buddy to ride home & come back with his truck & trailer! Not sure about strapping the bike down but I think we got it ok.

    The humiliating video below is from a fellow rider's YouTube Channel: Gallow X

     
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  11. toffeeboy

    toffeeboy Active Member

    Jul 21, 2016
    26
    28
    cheshire
    Yes you don't have to take the peashooters or the foot peg off a push bike to take the wheel off.
     
  12. toffeeboy

    toffeeboy Active Member

    Jul 21, 2016
    26
    28
    cheshire
    Yes help and advice :cool:
     
  13. andypandy

    andypandy Elite Member

    Jan 10, 2016
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    So, what general area of Cheshire do you live in ?
    What's your tool kit like ?
    Do you have a socket to fit the wheel nut ?
    Do you know of a local place where you can get a new tube fitted ?
    Do you have a manual with all the torque settings ?


    To Forum Members.
    Anyone willing to help ?
    Anyone got the tyre levers ?
     
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  14. Steve T.

    Steve T. Active Member

    Dec 6, 2020
    188
    33
    Northern British Columbia
    #14 Steve T., Jun 11, 2021
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2021
    Sorry, I'm a bit too far away and with Covid, Quarantine and all that! But, I may be back in UK next year :) if they let us out - Ah! but no tools, ok maybe with excess baggage on Air Canada...!

    T120 Bonnie:
    - Peashooters come off easy - 12mm nut behind the pegs (push down on the pegs to get nut off - no need to dismantle the clicky spring thingy in the peg itself), 5mm hex at pipe to muffler/silencer connection. Left side also needs 2 x 12mm spanners/wrenches for the bracket (Yup, I'm now bilingual) - twist and patiently slide them out.
    - Be careful not to damage the graphite seals in the end of the silencer during reinsertion. The brake caliper simply slots back into place. No need to touch the wheel/chain alignment bolts but it's a good opportunity to clean everything that you can't usually get to including the chain itself - a quick wash in kerosene/paraffin with a toothbrush (but don't let it soak too long) - dry it off and work some fresh lube into the link plates - wipe off any excess etc.... Also a good idea to check chain tension and wheel alignment after a thorough cleaning and wheel replacement - I think the chain "slack" is 20-30mm
    - Rear axle is 27mm and 110Nm torque (Socket, ring or open end spanner will work) 110Nm is pretty high in general terms - so, if you don't have a torque wrench it's close to the most you could do by hand (but, don't stand on it with your foot! - I've seen this before - that'll likely be far to much!)


    Hope someone can help get the wheel out - with bike on C/stand it's not a big job
    Removing the tyre/tire you'll need a "bead-breaker" and 3 LONG tire irons! - in my experience I've only ever managed to get a tyre off once and that was using the side-stand on another bike to push the bead down (Yup, we scratched & damaged the outer "lip" of the rim). One time, no bead breaker nothing else worked we used a hacksaw to cut the tire off!!
    Should be some YouTubes out there that may help
    The recent Haynes manual is pretty good (even if they seem to have stopped including "exploded drawings" …but you can find these on the web as well.
    Good luck - hope this helps a little (Pls excuse if I'm overdoing it)
     
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  15. andypandy

    andypandy Elite Member

    Jan 10, 2016
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    Thanks for that Steve, that's just the ticket. However, it would seem that toffeeboy has got things sorted or no longer wants our help.
     
  16. Tigcraft

    Tigcraft Unheard of Member

    Mar 29, 2014
    2,513
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    Holmfirth West Yorkshire
    Yep I see it your way, aged 10 I also got ‘rear’ tyre punctures down to 8 minutes fastest on fixed gear cycles but that was leaving the wheel on and a dragging the tube partly out.
     
  17. Yorkshireman

    Yorkshireman Crème de la Crème
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    I realised I may have been a bit harsh and dismissive of his mechanical skills and if he’d been a bit closer I’d have gone and done it for him. Hope he gets sorted soon.
     
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  18. Pegscraper

    Pegscraper Elite Member

    Jun 12, 2020
    2,153
    800
    Yorkshire
    Breaking the bead of the old tyre is by far the hardest part of tyre removal/replacement IMO. Fortunately, I have a large bench mounted vice which will take a wheel and carefully squeze the tyre walls until the bead breaks, usually on one side but a bit of twisting breaks the other side. Refitting is usually straight forward but, basically, if you're really struggling you're not doing it right. Once you've done a few you'll not think much of it. I've found with experience that the amount of effort required relates directly to the amount of swearing! :mad: A good tip is to use some pieces of plastic milk carton or similar as rim protection.
     
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  19. Yorkshireman

    Yorkshireman Crème de la Crème
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    I found the swearing was mainly from my mum and directly proportionate to the number of bent spoons I’d used to get the tyre off the rim. (Age 10(ish)):)
     
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  20. toffeeboy

    toffeeboy Active Member

    Jul 21, 2016
    26
    28
    cheshire
    Thanks for the offer, I moved from Cheshire a year ago so in Lancs now,

    I've got the local bike shop to help out (I think) so fingers crossed
     
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