1967/1969 Bonnie Rebuild Desert Sled Project - Any Advice

Discussion in 'Vintage Classics' started by Sundance, Sep 15, 2021.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. Samsgrandad

    Samsgrandad Senior Member

    Dec 15, 2019
    452
    113
    Somerset
    That crack on the primary cover needs to be fixed, it may not look to you as if it goes all the way through but it probably does. If it doesn't now it will do in the future. You are going to a great deal of work and expense to rebuild this. Do it once and do it properly!!

    Best of luck and keep us up to date with progress
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  2. Sundance

    Sundance Member
    Subscriber

    Aug 2, 2021
    62
    18
    Arlington, VA
    Some more photos to go with my last post.

    IMG_1402.jpeg

    IMG_1403.jpeg

    IMG_1409.jpeg

    IMG_1410.jpeg
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. Sundance

    Sundance Member
    Subscriber

    Aug 2, 2021
    62
    18
    Arlington, VA
    On to the timing side. Looking at the intake cam gear it looks like somewhere along the line someone beat on it a bit as there are some marks on the face. Also I had a bear getting the exhaust cam gear off because I couldn’t get my puller to engage the threads. I noticed the first couple of threads on the gear were messed up a bit. So I carefully filed the threads a bit with a jewelers file to try to remove the first thread a bit. I finally got the puller to engage by slowly threading it on and off with some oil. Perhaps this gear should be replaced when rebuilding or at least get the threads fixed? I couldn’t get the key out of the exhaust cam.

    I seemed to get the gearbox out rather easily. I’m not sure how to evaluate the gears, but they all look pretty stout to me now.

    I ended up with one part that I’m not sure where it came from - a thick washer or ? I’ve managed to keep everything else segregated.

    Now to split the cases.

    IMG_1414.jpeg

    IMG_1417.jpeg

    IMG_1418.jpeg

    IMG_1422.jpeg

    IMG_1428.jpeg

    IMG_1437.jpeg

    IMG_1439.jpeg

    IMG_1441.jpeg

    IMG_1443.jpeg

    IMG_1444.jpeg
     
    • Like Like x 2
  4. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

    Oct 26, 2015
    6,152
    1,000
    Southcoast of the UK Earth
    That is the roller part off the selector fork :)
     
    • Like Like x 2
  5. Sundance

    Sundance Member
    Subscriber

    Aug 2, 2021
    62
    18
    Arlington, VA
    Thanks darkman. I remember now - I believe there are 2 rollers.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. sprintdave

    sprintdave Nurse,he's out of bed again

    May 25, 2014
    1,283
    450
    Birmingham
    He is good ya know. Lol
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. Sundance

    Sundance Member
    Subscriber

    Aug 2, 2021
    62
    18
    Arlington, VA
    I got the cases split today. I still have some challenges ahead. First off it was difficult getting the cases apart, I had to heat them a bit before I got some movement. There seems to be an awful lot of gasket cement and other goo on all the joints.

    So, the intake cam is not original. I’m wondering if any forum members might be familiar with this brand - Megacycle Cams from California?

    I wasn’t able to get the rods off the crank. These say “JRC” and have 6 point star bolts. I got one loose but the other won’t budge with a long breaker. Any advice on how to get these off - many thanks! Do I finally need to get an impact driver?? Plus - any knowledge of these rods? They are obviously not original and I imagine I need to determine if they are still OK to use in the rebuild. I’ve got to get them off first. And one more thing - these do not have bushings in the small end so not sure how to manage that when I build it back.

    I could not remove the exhaust cam because I can’t get the key out of the end. It looks almost like whoever assembled the beast deformed the top of the key a bit. I’ve tried picks and such to get it out. Any ideas on how to remove this so I can take a look at the cam?

    I’m curious why someone would have filled in the hole with some compound (silicone?) on the end of the smaller transmission shaft?

    One end of the crank is buggered a bit from some PO. Not sure if this is still ok for the rebuild. Notice the bearing is still on the crank. I’m wondering what kind of puller is needed to get this off the crank?

    There is a number engraved on the flywheel of the crank - #10595 - any idea of what this is for? I am impressed by the weight of the flywheel!

    So, I’ve got to get the rods off, bearing off the crank, then I should find someone close by to do some hydro-blasting.

    Thanks for any comments or advice!!

    IMG_1448.jpeg

    IMG_1453.jpeg

    IMG_1459.jpeg

    IMG_1460.jpeg

    IMG_1470.jpeg

    IMG_1465.jpeg

    IMG_1466.jpeg

    IMG_1469.jpeg

    IMG_1471.jpeg

    IMG_1472.jpeg
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

    Oct 26, 2015
    6,152
    1,000
    Southcoast of the UK Earth
    A small amount of heat gently used would help with bolt removal and there are various pullers that can be used to remove main bearings. Megacycle and JRC are good after market parts, i have no info on cam numbers so it might be useful to find out what you have before reusing it, rods can be reused after deburring and polishing them. The sealer in the Torrington Roller hole was possibly precautionary as the bearing usually seals the hole in the casing and the number engraved on the crank indicates the crank has has some work done in the past.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  9. speedrattle

    speedrattle Senior Member

    Feb 19, 2021
    517
    143
    appalachia usa
    yes

    when you get the rods off dont be in a hurry to buy bearing shells until you know whether the crank has been re-ground undersize.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. Sundance

    Sundance Member
    Subscriber

    Aug 2, 2021
    62
    18
    Arlington, VA
    Got it. It seems there has been some significant work done in the past.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. Sundance

    Sundance Member
    Subscriber

    Aug 2, 2021
    62
    18
    Arlington, VA
    I was able to remove the rods with a longer breaker bar. I see there are no bushings in the small ends so this seems strange. I suppose it will be an issue when trying to fit new pistons. Also the big end bearings read: 70-3586. I appreciate comments on this reading!

    I removed the valves and it looks like they will need replacing. I noticed that one of the guides is different from the rest - the right side exhaust guide. I see lots of gunk near the guides, perhaps from too much gasket cement? The valve ends do show some indentations on the bearing surface and I wonder if this is normal or excessive?

    There was a question about the oil pump and the nuts used to secure it. The nuts securing this were lock nuts without washers.

    I’m still waiting on a bearing puller to get the bearing off the crank.

    Cleaning the gunk and oil off the cases is much more difficult than I imagined!

    IMG_1473.jpeg

    IMG_1504.jpeg

    IMG_1506.jpeg

    IMG_1477.jpeg

    IMG_1485.jpeg

    IMG_1494.jpeg

    IMG_1501.jpeg

    IMG_1502.jpeg

    IMG_1489.jpeg
     
    • Like Like x 3
  12. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

    Oct 26, 2015
    6,152
    1,000
    Southcoast of the UK Earth
    Some aftermarket rods come without small end bushes and the pin just fits in the plain rod and that is ok as the standard 500's are the same, the part number on the shells is the correct number for 650 shells and as there is no other stamping like 010 020 etc indicating a crank grind i would assume they are standard, only measuring the crank journals will tell. Its easier to replace valves these days rather than grind the tops and i prefer to use the standard nuts and locking washers for the oil pump and as for cleaning its either scrub them with Petrol or Paraffin until clean or get the cases and head vapour blasted.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  13. Sundance

    Sundance Member
    Subscriber

    Aug 2, 2021
    62
    18
    Arlington, VA
    Thanks darkman - So hopefully I can use these rods and the wrist pins of whatever pistons I fine will fit properly. When I removed the existing pins they one slid out and the other needed some heat and coaxing. I will measure the big end journals. Replacing the valves is definitely on my list, as well as my oil pump along with proper fasteners. I will keep scrubbing the cases and plan to have them hydro blasted. My local hydro blaster says the cases need to be free of all oil, dirt and gasket material before he will do his work.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  14. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

    Oct 26, 2015
    6,152
    1,000
    Southcoast of the UK Earth
    It will be worth fitting new nuts n bolts to the rods, dropping the pistons in hot water before installing pins helps :)
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  15. Sundance

    Sundance Member
    Subscriber

    Aug 2, 2021
    62
    18
    Arlington, VA
    Thanks for the tip on the pistons.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  16. Sundance

    Sundance Member
    Subscriber

    Aug 2, 2021
    62
    18
    Arlington, VA
    Exhaust cam key frustration - So, I still haven't been able to remove the exhaust cam because I cannot get the key out from the right side, so it will slide out of the bushing. I even purchased a very small punch to try to move it a bit but it doesn't want to move easily. I also notice that this bushing has a cutout (see photo) that I have aligned with the key in the photo. The intake side bushing did not have this cutout - so I'm wondering if this is something that is supposed to be there? I hesitate to apply and more energy to the key/cam/bushing to get it out. Any ideas/comments on this difficulty are appreciated!

    IMG_1465.jpeg
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. speedrattle

    speedrattle Senior Member

    Feb 19, 2021
    517
    143
    appalachia usa

    just to be clear

    the pin on the tight one was tight in the piston, correct?

    it should not be tight in the rod
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  18. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

    Oct 26, 2015
    6,152
    1,000
    Southcoast of the UK Earth
    There is no cutout in the bush from new, if it was my project i would warm the casing and remove the cam along with the bush and then remove the old key either by drilling or grinding it even if it means fitting a new bush.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Useful Useful x 1
  19. Sundance

    Sundance Member
    Subscriber

    Aug 2, 2021
    62
    18
    Arlington, VA
    I'm pretty sure this is correct. I will have to get the wrist pins and give them a try again through the small ends to find out.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  20. Sundance

    Sundance Member
    Subscriber

    Aug 2, 2021
    62
    18
    Arlington, VA
    OK, thanks. So does that bushing come out by pushing it inside the case? Must be.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
Loading...

Share This Page