The 2020 Speed Triple 1160 - Yes Or No?

Discussion in 'Speed Triple' started by Hippo-Drones, Sep 12, 2019.

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  1. chuk

    chuk Senior Member
    Subscriber

    Jan 10, 2017
    350
    113
    neilston glasgow
    Read the MCN reviews and seems a cracker but unless agricultural gearbox is seriously sorted would waste my money,I’ve had many bikes with far better boxes so I’m putting mine up for sale soon Fsh 2 owners 14k had muddy sump service last week.
     
  2. xorbe

    xorbe Noble Member

    Jan 27, 2021
    243
    343
    CA, USA
    At 15:25 he contradicts himself then, lol.

     
  3. Zaico

    Zaico Member

    Jul 10, 2020
    36
    13
    Sweden
    Haha yeah I noticed that too when I watched the whole thing after posting.. Guess I spoke too soon.
     
  4. Rtasker

    Rtasker Member

    Feb 18, 2018
    30
    18
    South West
    #244 Rtasker, May 3, 2021
    Last edited: May 3, 2021
    Thanks for going to the trouble of experimenting, Steve. I am slightly envious of the opportunity of four hour canyon rides, and I can well believe the RS makes this kind of ride a real blast. I still think if I had the choice I'd sacrifice some of the compression damping clicks at the top of the adjustment range and replace them with a few more at the bottom. But yes, it is a very fine handling machine.
     
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  5. dainesefreak

    dainesefreak Well-Known Member

    Mar 14, 2020
    102
    83
    West Midlands
    Well just had a shout from the local dealer to say they'd just taken delivery of the new Speed and to pop down, so I did.

    After a look around and a sit/bounce on the seat first impressions are . . . It's a Speed Triple. This might sound obvious, but it looks more like the Street than the out going model, slimmer, a bit less stocky feeling.

    Ergos felt much the same as the outgoing model from the seat. Seat's a bit weird, probably because I'm a short arse, but where it's stitched at the sides, it sort of digs in and pushes the legs out. Not overly comfortable holding it upright on the showroom floor. Build quality looked the usual decent Triumph of late. The suspension hardly compressed with me bouncing up and down. Sat on the Street and did the same and got some decent movement by comparison.

    Didn't get a chance to fire it up as it was still covered in stickers and plastic. I may take it for a spin if they stick it on as a demo. Also going to ride the newish Street when the weather picks up.
     
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  6. Stocks&Blondes

    Stocks&Blondes New Member

    May 3, 2021
    8
    3
    TX & NYC
    Picked mine up Saturday morning. Most incredible bike I’ve ever ridden. It’s currently still at the dealer awaiting a shipper to deliver to my home (weather prevented me riding it home) but ill certainly post some pictures once its here on Thursday
     
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  7. SteveRS

    SteveRS First Class Member

    Jan 12, 2019
    862
    500
    British Columbia
    Congrats!
     
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  8. 5teveb

    5teveb Well-Known Member

    Mar 6, 2021
    53
    68
    Fife
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  9. Neal H

    Neal H Active Member

    Mar 7, 2021
    174
    43
    England
    Pics for those of us not on Facebook?
     
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  10. 5teveb

    5teveb Well-Known Member

    Mar 6, 2021
    53
    68
    Fife
    looking a bit smug..

    20210507_222337.jpg
     
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  11. 5teveb

    5teveb Well-Known Member

    Mar 6, 2021
    53
    68
    Fife
  12. Neal H

    Neal H Active Member

    Mar 7, 2021
    174
    43
    England
    Fantastic! Mines also black, I can’t wait.
     
  13. Morty

    Morty New Member

    May 7, 2021
    16
    3
    Norway
    I've had mine for a couple of days and I definitely agree that the ride is firm. It's an absolute pleasure to ride on smooth pavement but not as enjoyable on rough/bumpy roads. Yesterday I adjusted the suspension a bit (a few clicks off front/rear rebound and compression) and it definitely helped. For tomorrow I am planning to adjust it even softer, basically go all the way out to the softest setting.

    Also, I think the throttle is a bit twitchy in road mode. It's super smooth in rain mode. I wish they would have softened road a bit, softened sport as well and then use the current sport as track.

    But overall it's an absolute beast!
     
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  14. SteveRS

    SteveRS First Class Member

    Jan 12, 2019
    862
    500
    British Columbia
    Whatever you do “DO NOT” go all the way out with the rebound. That is not going to soften the ride! It will make things bouncy and potentially unsafe at times. It’s fine to go all the way out with compression if you want it softer, just leave the rebound alone. You should also set up your sag settings, because if that is not set with correctly it will make the ride very firm. People think it’s the compression and rebound that make for a firm ride, it’s not, it’s the preload, which you adjust for a proper sag settings. If it’s wound on too much front and rear, it’s going to be very firm. Some people will need to replace springs as well to get proper sag settings. Things to keep in mind.
     
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  15. Morty

    Morty New Member

    May 7, 2021
    16
    3
    Norway
    Thanks for this, very useful. Suspension tuning is way outside of my expertise :)

    For what it's worth the Triumph manual suggests to adjust compression and rebound equally, and that preload should be 4 turns out no matter how soft you want your suspension:

    https://images.triumphmotorcycles.c...dbooks/april 2021/pb1/3850236-us.pdf?la=en-us

    I've now reduced the rear tire pressure from 41 psi (as delivered) to 36 psi. Now I think it's great. It feels sporty but not stiff. 41 psi rear is pretty jarring on some roads... my suspicion is that this perhaps contributed even more to my feeling of firmness than the suspension settings.
     
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  16. SteveRS

    SteveRS First Class Member

    Jan 12, 2019
    862
    500
    British Columbia
    Your welcome Morty. It’s definitely a little confusing at first. I’ve been researching everything I can find on suspension tuning for a couple of years now, and feel as though I’m only just starting to understand how it all works together. I agree with tire pressures being an important part as well. It does factor into part of the suspension for sure. I now run my pressures 36 front and back. It’s more balanced with less harshness out back and the added pressure up front gives me more feel for cornering.

    As far as Triumph recommending 4 turns out for preload, that’s absurd. How is 4 clicks out going to give proper sag settings for every person who may ride the bike. A woman who is 110 pounds will need a completely different preload setting to achieve correct sag vs a man who is 240 pounds. That’s why it’s important to go to a suspension specialist or learn yourself. Correct sag settings are one of the most important settings that should be setup before you even ride the bike for the first time. A close second should be rebound. Incorrect rebound can even make the bike potentially dangerous to ride. Compression will only assist the spring to slow down or speed up how fast the fork compresses when braking and hitting bumps. Here a couple of examples of incorrect sag settings and how it will affect the motorcycle. Not enough sag: Suspension too firm which doesn’t allow the suspension to react to the road surface which makes for a very firm ride. But most importantly will results in the bike loosing traction as it bounces off road imperfections instead of absorbing them and keeping the tires stuck to the road. Too much sag: Suspension will feel very soft and wallow over the road surface giving poor traction as well, as the tires will see increased forces put upon them as the bike dives in both directions during braking and acceleration. In emergency braking the front suspension can easily bottom out resulting in serious control issues. So you can see your preload for setting sag is very important. Anyway I just realized I’m rambling and letting my mild case of OCD get the best of me again. Cheers.
     
  17. Neal H

    Neal H Active Member

    Mar 7, 2021
    174
    43
    England
    Is there an idiot guide to sag/compression/rebound/rider weight?

    I assume sag is related to preload settings?
     
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  18. Dawsy

    Dawsy Cumbrian half-wit
    Subscriber

    Aug 24, 2018
    4,614
    800
    Cumbria
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  19. SteveRS

    SteveRS First Class Member

    Jan 12, 2019
    862
    500
    British Columbia
    Yes, preload Stiffens or softens the springs front and back to adjust sag settings. Here is a complete tutorial by one off the best in the business.
     
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  20. SteveRS

    SteveRS First Class Member

    Jan 12, 2019
    862
    500
    British Columbia
    Ok, today my brother and I checked my sag settings again, as they haven’t been checked since I first set it up from new. I found that the front had a little less total sag so I wound out 1 turn of preload (now 6 turns in) so front total sag is now the same as the rear. The rear preload has been wound all the way out from when the bike was new. I believe the springs have softened a little since new because the rear total sag, with the preload wound all the way out, was approximately 35mm at that time. So after adjusting the front preload today, here are the settings now. Note that front and rear settings have no correlation to one another. I took it for a good ride today and found that total sag front and back at 45mm was very compliant. I was slightly concerned that 45mm would be too much, but it proved to be a good compromise for the road. So anyone who is experiencing a harsh ride needs to check their total sag numbers, and adjust them accordingly. Note that for road use it is recommended to have total sag numbers equal front and back.

    Front settings:

    Preload - 6 turns in
    Static sag - 21mm
    Rider sag - 24mm
    Total sag - 45mm

    Rear settings:

    Preload - All the way out
    Static sag - 34mm
    Rider sag - 11mm
    Total sag - 45mm
     
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