Speed Twin

Discussion in 'Bonneville' started by Repooh, Oct 23, 2018.

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  1. Repooh

    Repooh Rarely Satisfied

    Jan 5, 2018
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    Not sure if this is real.

    Looks like a fat Street Twin

     
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  2. BigCLM

    BigCLM Senior Member

    Nov 30, 2017
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    San Rafael, CA
    New 1200 cc big brother to the Street Twin (I believe).
    Naked and styled like the street twin, but 1200 cc.
     
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  3. Flashp

    Flashp Noble Member

    Dec 6, 2017
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    #3 Flashp, Oct 24, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2018
    I don't think they got that right. It looks to me like they just assembled it with parts from different models and gave it a name.

    Stylistically some of these parts just don't belong together. They really haven't emulated the original, this is a minimum effort revenue generator. Clearly good business for them but possibly (hopefully) underestimating their customers. Do they ever gather VOC's (voice of the customer) to steer their development? I don't think so. I have two bikes bought new so Triumph will be aware of me as an owner if they cared to look at their warranty or sales records from dealers and my only recollection of any communication from Triumph was related to the debacle that was the stalling issue with the Thruxton.

    If they put an Art deco spin on a design (not this one) that would be something special. I wish manufacturers would employ artists to come up with these things then ask the engineers to make it real.

    Here's the original Speed Twin, the Speedmaster or Bobber are actually closer relatives I think. And I think the original is a ridiculously pretty bike.

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Adie P

    Adie P Elite Member

    Jul 7, 2018
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    Whether or not Triumph got that 2019 Speed Twin "right" is, of course, something that will be decided by time, market and - as ever - personal choice. Personally, I don't see any obvious 'parts assembly mismatch' in it but then, for me, the wider Bonneville range is, stylistically, something of a curate's egg.

    By and large I think the range, including this Speed Twin, is built around an evolutionary rather than revolutionary marketing model and the idea that the Bobber and the Speedmaster are more closely related to the original Speed Twin than is the 2019 model, is, for me, like saying chimpanzees are more closely related to humans than are orangutans ... it's a distinction without a particularly meaningful difference.

    The original Speed Twin you picture - as beautiful and desirable as it is now - has to be considered in the context, and 'climate', of the time it was designed and manufactured. In the late thirties and early forties, the great majority of motorcycles were built for utilitarian transport - the likes of Brough, Vincent et al. being the exception to prove the rule - and were intended to provide affordable means of travel for working people. It's a broad generalisation, I know, but the majority of the machines of that era were single cylinder - cheaper and easier to design, build, buy and run - so the Speed Twin offered a level of power that was unusual and unusually attractive. Again, a generalisation, but when Triumph introduced the first Speed Twin it was intended to succeed within that same 'utilitarian transport' market and not, necessarily, develop a whole new market segment .... at least initally.

    In that respect, I'd respectfully suggest that not much has changed. I'm pretty sure that the broad spread of market acceptance of the wide range of current Triumph models is a reflection of the ability of the company to listen to the (generic) voice of the customer. The thing is, 'the customer' speaks from many different viewpoints, countries, cultures and customs and there really isn't one single magic bullet - or bike - that will suit them all. Hence, I would suggest, the evolutionary model and range development.

    I'm sure "artists" do design bikes but the translation from art into the reality of something mass manufactured will always mean that there's a compromise - it's why true "custom" bike makers are a low volume, high price, niche market option.

    You're absolutely right about the original Speed Twin being ridiculously pretty but I wouldn't let that obscure any appreciation of its 2018 namesake.

    Regards,

    Adie
     
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  5. Flashp

    Flashp Noble Member

    Dec 6, 2017
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    #5 Flashp, Oct 24, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2018
    Good points Adie, a healthy debate although I remain unconvinced ;)
    For me the rest of the range is clearly defined but this looks an oddball with no discernable nod to the original and is somewhat confused.

    It has the Thruxton's slip-ons with a scrambler-esque rear mud guard, Street Triple mirrors on bike that actually looks more like a Bonneville T120 with cast wheels. Well that's how it looks to me at least :confused:

    I'd be interested why you think the Bonneville range is both good and bad...
    'chimpanzees are more closely related to humans than are orangutans' - do you think then that Triumph are correct in releasing models under the banner of 'Bonneville' and that it shouldn't have to resemble or acknowledge it's namesake in appearance?

    Anyone else??
     
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  6. foxy52

    foxy52 Active Member

    Jan 9, 2017
    178
    43
    Derbyshire
    I think this Speed Twin looks great - as I do each & every other model in the Triumph range, including the 1200 Scrambler. In fact every Triumph that's ever been built! I don't care if it's a mix 'n match & whether there's any resemblance to the original. As a stand alone bike, without comparing to anything else, this is one beautiful machine.
     
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  7. Adie P

    Adie P Elite Member

    Jul 7, 2018
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    Hi Flashp - a healthy debate indeed and a worthy topic.

    I do see your point of view about the lack of 'discernible nod' to the original ... if you refer only to the first and original "roadster" - for want of a better term.

    The last - and undoubtedly best-known, if only because of sales volume - of the line of Speed Twins (which incidentally, and appropos of nothing more than a personal view, is my all time favourite of the line) had full enclosure bathtubs, fully valanced front mudguard and the famous headlamp nacelle, but you wouldn't really expect a present day roadster to pick up on any of those features as a styling cue, so I don't think that failure on the part of this new model is anything of a detraction. I guess, perhaps, we're both hanging our personal preferences (prejudices?) on the use of the name rather than the meriits of the machine?

    The reason for my 'curate's egg' reference with regard to the Bonneville is, again, down to my personal preference/prjudice. I don't much like chopper, custom, cruiser or bobber style bikes and there are a number of models in the current Bonnie range that incorporate one, another or a number of the features of these styles of machine. Nevertheless, I do acknowledge that all of the these have their place in the broad church in which we (or some us, at least) worship and what's good for me isn't ever going to be a universal truth - stylistically or socially!

    When you think about it, Triumph Hinckley have recycled pretty much every one of the relatively few model names attached to Meriden (et al) manufactured bikes, mostly without any retrospective reference at all to previous bearer's of the name. And yet that hasn't really sparked any debate, AFAIK, about the worthiness of the nomenclature on the modern machine - or has it? Dunno. True, the Bonnie is a twin; the Trident is a triple and those are obvious links, but Trophy, Thunderbird, Tiger - do they have any linked heritage to their foreborn namesakes? And, indeed do we expect, want or need them to so do? Again, dunno.

    My view is that Triumph use the model names to provide a relatively easy cue to BRAND - rather than model - recognition. If you're of an age anything remotely approaching mine (heaven forfend, for your sake) it will probably have more relevance and/or importance but, in my view, it shouldn't really colour the judgement of the product.

    Yes, it would be nice to have more and wider views on the topic. I do find it interesting, especially as I've been quite fanatical about Triumphs since about 1963 when I saw and heard on Robins Lane in St. Helens, my first ....... guess what ....... Triumph Speed Twin!


    Regards,

    Adie
     
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  8. Uncle Olaf

    Uncle Olaf Member

    Mar 23, 2018
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    Genk, Belgium
    Parts assembly or not, I like it.. Triumph has the right to use their 'old models names' anyway they want. It is called evolution. You can't expect them to buy the old models anymore… With a few exceptions, I like the whole classic range, and this Speed Twin is no exception to that fact. And let's not forget, the only goal of any company is not in the first place to make the customer happy, but to make money. Happy customers are collateral advantages.
     
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  9. David Ludlow

    David Ludlow New Member

    Dec 4, 2018
    2
    3
    London
    My 1 st post so here goes.
    I love it, I wanted a Bonnie for younger people. I'm 50 but it just seemed that the T100/T120 are aimed at older guys. My dad bless him has his T120 looking like a 50s bike but quite liked the old air cooled Bonnie with the 17" front wheel. SE I believe?
    Plus I wanted a Thruxton with flat bars, kind of like it was a prequel to a speed triple maybe?
    Anyway we'll see very soon.
     
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  10. Wessa

    Wessa Cruising
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    Apr 27, 2016
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    Having only viewed the video and not seen the bike in the flesh, IMHO it looks really smart. I had the 900 street twin and whilst I loved the look of the bike I did find it just a little lacking on the road. With a 1200 engine in the bike I reakon it will make a massive difference to the performance of the bike.
    Wessa
     
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  11. David Ludlow

    David Ludlow New Member

    Dec 4, 2018
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    Having just watched the launch party.
    I love it
     
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  12. David Ludlow

    David Ludlow New Member

    Dec 4, 2018
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    3
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    Having just watched the launch party.
    I love it
     
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  13. Tiglet

    Tiglet Vintage Member
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    Mar 28, 2016
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    Looks like a parts bin special :eek:

    Using the model names of bikes from yesteryear is has been a marketing master stroke for Triumph.

    Norton are following Triumphs trend.
     
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  14. Yorkshireman

    Yorkshireman Crème de la Crème

    Dec 12, 2015
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    It would be on my list for that reason too, a Thruxton with a better ( more upright) seating position.
     
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  15. tcbandituk

    Subscriber

    Apr 8, 2016
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    Looks good, just needs a decent size petrol tank.....
     
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  16. Bikerman

    Bikerman Crème de la Crème
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    Oct 29, 2014
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    Like the bike, but for me the back ends a disaster
    [​IMG]
     
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  17. Rich Bryce

    Rich Bryce Dead Eye Dick
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    Sep 18, 2015
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    It's basically a Thruxton 1200 tune in a Street Twin frame, so with the straight bars and more forward pegs, or so I've been told.
     
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  18. Wessa

    Wessa Cruising
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    Apr 27, 2016
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    Sounds about right Rich..... Still think it looks good.
    Wessa
     
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  19. Rich Bryce

    Rich Bryce Dead Eye Dick
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    Sep 18, 2015
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    Me too. I'm hoping it's not too tall for us less-than-long-in-the-leg types.
     
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  20. Wessa

    Wessa Cruising
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    Apr 27, 2016
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    Interesting thought.......
     
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  21. John T

    John T Senior Member

    Jun 4, 2015
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    Sticking with Ting Tong but she'll be getting a new TEC camshaft soon
     
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