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Featured Replacing Brake Pads

Discussion in 'Technical Help' started by Vulpes, Jun 30, 2018.

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  1. Vulpes

    Vulpes Confused Member
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    #1 Vulpes, Jun 30, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2018
    Get parts, consult manual
    20180630_101830.jpg
    Set up bike
    20180630_102922.jpg
    Take out r-clip
    20180630_103019.jpg
    Remove pin
    20180630_103106.jpg
    Remove spring
    20180630_103207.jpg
    Remove pads
    20180630_103401.jpg
    CAREFULLY push in pistons
    20180630_103739.jpg
    Lightly grease back of pads and thread on pin with copper grease
    20180630_103917.jpg
    Insert pads
    20180630_104009.jpg
    Insert spring and pin
    20180630_104132.jpg
    Fasten pin, replace r-clip, clean caliper. Repeat other side, job done.
     
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  2. Oldyam

    Oldyam Grumpy Old Git

    May 14, 2017
    978
    500
    Delvin Ireland
    I would have used the old pads and a pair of vise grips to push back the pistons, less chance of marking / damaging anything.

    If you lever back one pad then fit the new pad in that side then lever back with the other pad you have less risk of distorting the disk too, then drop in the second pad. Clean the pins lightly lubricate the pin and copper grease the threads before reassembly.
     
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  3. Dozers Dad

    Dozers Dad Bushmills Chief Quality Controller
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    #3 Dozers Dad, Jun 30, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2018
    Hi Vulpes,

    All I would add to what yourself & Oldyam have said/done....

    Whilst the pistons are still out. Remove the caliper. Spray the pistons with brake cleaner & scrub them with an old toothbrush. Otherwise any crap that has collected on the pistons. Gets forced past the seal as they are compressed back into the caliper.

    Your photos are very comprehensive though. They would make it very easy for anyone to carry out the same task. Thanks for sharing this simple step by step guide.

    Edit.... I've just spotted that you haven't greased the thread on the retaining pin. The shaft part doesn't really need greasing but the thread does mate. That's the bit that is most likely to seize up.
    Oldyam mentioned it as well.
     
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  4. Vulpes

    Vulpes Confused Member
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    Thanks for the useful additions @Dozers Dad and @Oldyam.
    The idea was to make it easy for anyone new to this.
     
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  5. Dozers Dad

    Dozers Dad Bushmills Chief Quality Controller
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    Did you spot my edit Vulpes?

    If I was you I'd remove the pin. Wipe off the grease from the shaft & grease the threads.
    There is a very remote chance that wind/rain could dislodge the grease from the shaft & it could end up on your pads.
    Take a look at your photos & hopefully you'll see what I mean mate?
     
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  6. Vulpes

    Vulpes Confused Member
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    I see what you mean - I rectified that in my post and will get the pins out again and correct that. Mind you, the manual says to lightly grease the pin? Do they mean the thread?
     
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  7. MrOrange

    MrOrange The Lunatics have definitely taken over !!!!
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    Oct 28, 2015
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    I would, apply an anti seize / corrosion grease to pin and thread, wipe excess from pin on application.
    Screenshot_20180630-134300.png

    Google acf50 anti corrosion grease. Use it now on all stuff like this. Then paint it on the caps of your fasteners when job finished. Keeps em shiny
     
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  8. Dozers Dad

    Dozers Dad Bushmills Chief Quality Controller
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    Not sure mate?
    I see no logical reason for greasing anything other than the threads & possibly a small amount on the tip of the other end.

    Having it all along the shaft isn't going to do anything except attract dirt & offer a bit of protection from corrosion. I guess it'll also prevent the pads from sticking to the shaft of the pin in extreme conditions?
    If you still want to apply some grease just do it very sparingly.
     
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  9. Oldyam

    Oldyam Grumpy Old Git

    May 14, 2017
    978
    500
    Delvin Ireland
    The idea with greasing the pin is to provide anti-seize, lubrication and corrosion protection, the grease on the non threaded part of the pin is meant to be just a very light coating, virtually invisible.

    So as @MrOrange said wipe off the excess, also be aware of any corrosion in the hole towards the end of the pin causing tightness on reassembly.
     
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  10. Vulpes

    Vulpes Confused Member
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    I've taken them out and made sure the shaft of the pin is very lightly coated, and very lightly greased the threads. Thanks for your help.
     
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  11. BB3Lions

    BB3Lions BB3Lions™©®
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    Jul 26, 2018
    824
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    I would suggest you redo it again from scratch - only because I'm thinking of doing it myself & it's somewhere confusing :)

    Great writeup mind, not sure I've the confidence to decipher what everyone is saying lol
     
  12. Vulpes

    Vulpes Confused Member
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    Dead easy mate - and my brakes are great now!
     
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  13. Smilinjack

    Smilinjack Crème de la Crème

    Aug 14, 2016
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    A good chunk of this thread matters a very small amount. Quick checklist:
    Do you have correct pads?
    Do you have correct tools?
    Do you have a hand at the end of each arm?
    Could you think your way out of a paper bag?
    Answer yes to all of those, then crack on, you'll be fine :)
     
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  14. BB3Lions

    BB3Lions BB3Lions™©®
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    Can't find my pads on sportsbikeshop or other at the moment.

    Might stick with oem for now, saying that, I'll nip to my container tonight and check if they need doing, gets me out the house & now I know what to look for lol
     
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  15. Dozers Dad

    Dozers Dad Bushmills Chief Quality Controller
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    What model/year is your bike BB?
    I'll have a look on Fleabay for you if you like.
     
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  16. BB3Lions

    BB3Lions BB3Lions™©®
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    Jul 26, 2018
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    2015 Street Triple R ABS mate :)
     
  17. Dozers Dad

    Dozers Dad Bushmills Chief Quality Controller
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    It looks like the EBC code for the front pads is FA347HH & FA213 for the rears?

    Type those codes into Ebay/Google. You'll get to see all the EBC pads. As well as other manufacturers quoting EBC codes to attract buyers for their a.n.other brands of pads.

    Don't forget you'll need two sets of FA347HH.

    Top tip....
    Never search by make, model & year. Always find the product code & search that. Often the same pads are used in the front of a 500cc & the rear of a 1400cc. Obviously sellers will always charge more for pads for the 1400cc if they can get away with it?
     
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  18. BB3Lions

    BB3Lions BB3Lions™©®
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    Jul 26, 2018
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    Where did you find the codes? Not in the Haynes manual :(


    I think the fronts look OK, still got the grooves, not sure on the rear as there are no grooves, so I assume as I never use them, they're quite OK

    DSC_0005.JPG

    DSC_0006.JPG
     
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  19. Dozers Dad

    Dozers Dad Bushmills Chief Quality Controller
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    By looking at 6 or so adverts for pads that fit a 2015 Triumph Street Triple R. Once I had confirmed the codes.
    I did another search using the codes only. No mention of the bike itself in my search criteria.
    The same rules apply to spark plugs & batteries etc etc.
    A plug is a plug as far as the manufacture is concerned. The same goes for a battery, windscreen wipers, tyres, air filters, oil filters etc.
     
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  20. BB3Lions

    BB3Lions BB3Lions™©®
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    OK total N00B question but one set of FA347HH for each side or does the set come with x4 sets?

    Sorry lol

    I'm hoping from the pics they dont need doing hahaha
     
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