Camping Advice

Discussion in 'Rideouts, Trackdays, Touring & Spotted' started by Ray Marshall, Jan 28, 2022.

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  1. DamonYVR

    DamonYVR Member

    Dec 2, 2021
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    Vancouver BC Canada
    I don't know if you are thinking of doing the motocamping or camping thing just once or twice, or more regularly. If this is a one off, budget items make sense. If you might do this more, consider looking at bicycle camping gear. We have a Big Agnes bike packing tent and sleeping pad. Both are very small and light, and well made. The drawback is price (you can solve all problems with money). I also have a small, collapsing chair and table, which you may or may not need depending on your camping facilities.

    Get a two person tent if you are alone, or a three person tent if there are two of you. Tents are small and you'll want to have some room to move around, get dressed and possibly bring some stuff in overnight.
     
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  2. Iceman

    Iceman Crème de la Crème

    Apr 19, 2020
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    Smilinjack gives great advice, I have camped in winter conditions, mostly in the mountains whilst climbing multi day trips, even at ground level in February the weather can turn and it gets really cold, you make no mention of the area/areas you intend to visit, the beginning of February in Scotland is a different animal to early February say in Cornwall, staying warm is all about layers, not just on top but base layers as well, especially for sleeping at night, ensure you are in the right layers for sleeping in is crucial for keeping your body warm, once it’s time to climb in your sleeping bag you don’t want to lose essential heat trying to change into clothing in the cold of the night.
    Riding boots outside the tent in winter can mean you will end up with them frozen come morning, so keep your footwear inside the tent. The right thermal/warm socks, gloves and hat will go a long way to keeping you warm while camping in winter. Many campsites close for the winter, especially Scotland, be prepared to wild camp or find the sites that are open throughout winter. Watch the elements and be aware of the weather forecast during the night, If the wind is due to pick up, heavy rain or even snow is forecast, ensure you are prepared. My advise would be to buy the best kit you can afford, a sleeping bag comes in may forms, for example down and synthetic, down when wet is difficult to dry but offer some of the best protection. I recognise you are camping low level but even so temperatures can plummet, and you have a full days riding ahead, you need to be warm and alert, not cold and dysfunctional. I only camp out of necessity through my passion of Mountaineering, wild camping may sound romantic, but a cold early February after riding when it may have rained that day, wet kit to dry, a tent to put up, food to prepare, hot drinks etc etc, also you need to consider toilet facilities, getting out of the tent at night in high winds and rain is impractical, you need to consider a (pee bottle) different for male and female. Cheap equipment whether camping at low level or high altitude is not worth it, you can get away with a 2/3 season tent/sleeping bag in summer, but not winter, light is right when choosing gear, whatever you decide stay and ride safe and keep the forum posted on your progress.
     
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  3. Wessa

    Wessa Cruising

    Apr 27, 2016
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    Some great responses @Ray Marshall regarding cold weather camping, but for me cheap b&b would be what I would be looking to do, just as @littleade says. If you do want to camp stay safe mate.
     
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  4. Col_C

    Col_C I can't re...Member

    Aug 5, 2015
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    I guess it's an age thing (I'm late 60's), did some camping in my younger days and had some great times, but was always from a car and never before Easter. Carrying a load of extra gear on a bike just spoils the ride for me, a comfy bed in a B&B/hotel is the perfect way to end a good day in the saddle IMO...........
    But hey, I'm just an old "Victor Meldrew", enjoy whatever you do and as has been said we need photos or it didn't happen! :)

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Sandi T

    Sandi T It's ride o'clock somewhere!
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    Dec 3, 2018
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    Well, you'd just about convinced me to change my tune about camping, @Iceman (well, no, not really), until I read your words saying "you need to consider a (pee bottle) different for male and female". :eek::scream::joy: I had to use one of those things for a few weeks after breaking my pelvis. I don't ever want to be in a position (no pun intended) to have to use one of those things again. Especially if it's cold, wet, dark, and windy! I always say I'll ride my motorcycle 500+ miles a day multiple days in a row. But at the end of the day I'd like a hot shower, a glass of wine or martini, a good dinner, and an actual bed. This remains my idea of camping........

    camping in a hotel room copy.png
     
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  6. Iceman

    Iceman Crème de la Crème

    Apr 19, 2020
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    Sorry to hear about your previous broken pelvis Sandi and I can relate to that, although it is a lot worse for women (the loo part that is), the pain is still real especially the toilet bit. Back to the camping I'm with you, my priority is a bed, hot shower and a good breakfast to set me up for the day. Hats off to you though Sandi I couldn't ride 500 miles a day (but that's a long story). The photo is wild camping from a climb I did on Mont Blanc at the start of winter.

    Mont Blanc 6.JPG
     
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  7. Golgotha

    Golgotha Guest

    #27 Golgotha, Feb 2, 2022
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 2, 2022
    @Ray Marshall - Another REALLY good piece of kit is a milsurp poncho liner. Basically a thinly quilted blanket that's worth its weight in gold. I mentioned Varusteleka.com in another thread I tagged you in. They're about the best source for high quality military field kit. Varusteleka has Dutch Army issue ones that IMO are the best available, and I say that coming from the country that invented the poncho liner… AKA "woobie." They get them in stock regularly and they sell out REAL quick.

    https://www.varusteleka.com/en/product/dutch-woobie-poncho-liner-surplus/61165
     
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  8. Sandi T

    Sandi T It's ride o'clock somewhere!
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    Dec 3, 2018
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    That is a truly stunning photograph, @Iceman! :heart_eyes: And that is quite the "campsite". Now I see how you came up with your forum name-- "Iceman". It must be quite a feat to get a hot shower under those conditions. :eek: Do you still do wild camping?? Also, I'm curious about your "long story". Perhaps you'll share it sometime?
     
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  9. Iceman

    Iceman Crème de la Crème

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    Hi Sandy, thanks for your kind words, for a shower I had to wait until I was back down and in civilisation so to speak, unfortunately no more wild camping, not from choice, it links with the long story, I will have a think about the "long story". Mountaineering gives you huge amounts of personal highs, unfortunately it also gives great heartache in equal measures. The White Spider inspired me early on for mountaineering, recently I watched the film "The Alpinist", Marc-André Leclerc climbed alone, far from the limelight on remote alpine faces, the free-spirited 23-year-old Canadian made some of the boldest solo ascents in history. Yet he drew scant attention. With no cameras, no rope, and no margin for error, Leclerc's approach is the essence of solo adventure. Nomadic and publicity shy, he didn't own a phone or car, and was reluctant to let a film crew in on his pure vision of climbing. Veteran filmmaker Peter Mortimer set out to make a film about Leclerc but struggled to keep up with him. Leclerc went on a historic adventure in Patagonia that redefined what is possible in solo climbing. Reinhold Messner said of Marc-André Leclerc he was the new generation of extremely talented free climbers (praise indeed from one of the worlds greatest climbers and adventurists), tragically he lost his life in March 2018 after climbing a first ascent outside Juneau, Alaska, with Ryan Johnson. He was descending the way hundreds of climbers every day on different mountains descend. They were a few hundred feet from the base camp where they had left their equipment when they were struck by an avalanche.
    The tragic story of audacious climber Marc-André Leclerc is told by his partner Brette Harrington – HERO (hero-magazine.com). Brette still climbs solo and I genuinely believe they were "soulmates"
     
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  10. Peter B

    Peter B Active Member

    May 24, 2020
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    I quite like a decent bed after a long day...... And a hot bath. If you are going to camp in winter max 8mm inflateable sleeping mat, anthing bigger can increase condensation n in the tent.
     
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  11. Sandi T

    Sandi T It's ride o'clock somewhere!
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    Dec 3, 2018
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    Thanks for this post, @Iceman. I shall read the link to the story of Leclerc when I have a cup off tea and some time. It's off to bed for me now, though. And, yes, please think about that "long story". I'm quite interested and curious if you're willing to share whether here or PM.
     
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  12. Ray Marshall

    Ray Marshall New Member

    Jun 1, 2021
    13
    3
    Kingsteignton
    Thanks again for all the advice. I went for the MSR Whisperlite stove which worked brilliantly, a berghaus peak sleeping mat which will be going back to the shop as I spent all night sliding of its non slip surface and an oex fathom ev400 bag which was comfortable and warm with my thermals on, definitely not to be used in -8 temps as it says is it’s comfort level. It was 4 degrees and very windy and felt a lot cooler until I layered up. Think I’ll be buying a snug pak softie for next year.

    5BFD1A33-5FE6-4E91-A9B9-403368C656FB.jpeg
     
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  13. Helmut Visor

    Helmut Visor Only dead fish go with the flow
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    Oct 3, 2018
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    Glad you got back to us, always good to see the results of all those opinions ;)
     
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  14. Iceman

    Iceman Crème de la Crème

    Apr 19, 2020
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    Great of you to keep the forum posted, the Snugpak you mention are very good, I have used them in the past, the Softie Elite 5 is a good choice, it offers up to -15 protection, it packs down reasonably small, you should get one for under £150, go for the Thermorest mat as these are top notch, if you want a self inflatable one (rolls up the same size as a sleeping mat) I can let you have one for a nominal £20 + postage at cost if this helps. The MSR Whisperlite stoves are around the best out there. Great picture and glad it all went well for you. Ride safe from an ageing Rocker.
     
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  15. MadgeAguillon

    MadgeAguillon New Member

    Sep 27, 2022
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    0
    uk
    You should always buy only water-resistant flashlights. We often go camping in places full of rivers. That’s why drowning a flashlight has become a sort of tradition.
     
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