1995 750 Trident

Discussion in 'Technical Help' started by Tony Hayden, Dec 18, 2019.

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  1. Tony Hayden

    Tony Hayden Member

    Dec 9, 2019
    31
    18
    Leicester
    Morning all, Many thanks for all of your welcome messages. The undoing of seized bolts nuts etc is going well on the servicing front apart from changing the air box filter ( don't want to take the carbs off).
    How can I lower the bike by about an 1". I don't like balancing a top heavy bike on my tip toes.
    Thanks all.
     
  2. Adie P

    Adie P Crème de la Crème

    Jul 7, 2018
    3,454
    1,000
    MID DEVON
    The only logical/sensible way to "lower" an early Hinckley Trident/Sprint is to get the seat modified to take an inch or so out of the padding material height, and have it shaped to slightly narrow it. Since there isn't a great deal of foam in the rider's portion of the seat to start with, that might prove uncomfortable! The backbone spine frame and seat rail sub-chassis combination makes modification seriously difficult - unless you want to radically change the bike by going for a CRK conversion.

    I'd guess that, in theory, you could try to alter the ride height with suspension linkage and fork position changes but that looks more than a little specialised and the outcomes/effects less than certain.

    I'm sure it's not impossible, but it's not, IMHO, going to be uncomplicated
     
  3. capt

    capt Elite Member

    May 8, 2016
    2,902
    750
    western Australia
    Stiffen the front fork's by additional length of tubular spacer , to reduce 'sag' and then lower the the front over the fork leg's. You can also spin the axle adjustment so the bike is lowered . add the suggestion of cutting/,trimming the seat you might be happy ... :)
     
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  4. Tom Gillam

    Tom Gillam Guest

    Hi there,
    You could consider raising the forks,(dropping the front),and using shorter rear shocks,if this makes sense.
     
  5. capt

    capt Elite Member

    May 8, 2016
    2,902
    750
    western Australia
    That's what I said above , getting a shorter shock (as they are "mono shocked") might be a bit expensive , and as it's mono it's a helluva lotta more work , than Changing Shockies that are frame to swing arm mounted , Mono's are inside the frame and not easily accessible !
     
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  6. Adie P

    Adie P Crème de la Crème

    Jul 7, 2018
    3,454
    1,000
    MID DEVON
    I'd like, if I may, to add a word of caution about inverting the axle/chain adjusters. I seem to recall that, 'back in the day' this was fairly common - usually, as stated, in conjunction with raising the fork stanchions in the yokes - as an approach to lowering, but, if you do this, please keep a very close eye on chain and chain slider wear. I have a feeling that a number of people that used this approach did see rapid wear of the slider and even of the swinging arm.
     
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  7. capt

    capt Elite Member

    May 8, 2016
    2,902
    750
    western Australia
    Yup you have to check chain tension/adjustment VERY regularly ! Like every 500/1000 klms for new chain and more frequently after after 8/10 thousand !

    More frequently lubricating the chain helps longevity and therefore fewer adjustment's.
     
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  8. t552

    t552 Senior Member

    Nov 17, 2014
    411
    113
    Bristol UK
    YSS do length adjustable shocks
    Nice shocks. Too. I can offer a little dicount too.
    Pm me if interested or email
    [email protected]
     
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