1967/1969 Bonnie Rebuild Desert Sled Project - Any Advice

Discussion in 'Vintage Classics' started by Sundance, Sep 15, 2021.

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  1. speedrattle

    speedrattle Senior Member

    Feb 19, 2021
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    if you cannot find champion N3C then the old N3 crossover was NGK B8ES, which i have run for years.

    now discontinued.

    but i have recently read that triumph reccomended NGK B9ES for triumphs, which you can find.

    NGK B10ES are too cold, ime, and will foul.

    but so did champion N3, and N3G. for me, anyway.
     
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  2. Sundance

    Sundance Well-Known Member

    Aug 2, 2021
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    Thanks SR
     
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  3. Sundance

    Sundance Well-Known Member

    Aug 2, 2021
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    Final drive chain question. I am trying to determine if my final drive chain is OK to use again - probably not. But using the directions from the Triumph workshop manual, section A13, it reads to check for excessive wear you, “scribe two marks on a flat table exactly 12 1/2 inches apart, place the chain opposite the two marks. When the chain is compressed to its minimum free length the marks should coincide with two pivot pins 20 links apart.” In the case of my old chain when I measure it against 12 1/2 inches I am only 19 links apart. So I am reading this as my chain is stretched way beyond where it should be. I am reading this correctly? Thanks.

    IMG_2775.jpeg
     
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  4. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

    Oct 26, 2015
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    If i don't know the history of a chain for the few quid spent on a new one its piece of mind :)
     
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  5. Sundance

    Sundance Well-Known Member

    Aug 2, 2021
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    I think you are right on this. I've replaced the sprocket with a stock 46 tooth one, so assume I'd need a stock length chain. Do you happen to know what length/how may links that would be for a new chain? I see some 530 chains in various lengths, like 107, 110 and 120.
     
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  6. darkman

    darkman Crème de la Crème

    Oct 26, 2015
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    I always get 110 as its good for 500 and 650's with most gear combos and trim if req, i like to keep things simple lol.
     
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  7. Sundance

    Sundance Well-Known Member

    Aug 2, 2021
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    Thank you!
     
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  8. speedrattle

    speedrattle Senior Member

    Feb 19, 2021
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    #268 speedrattle, Mar 28, 2022
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2022
    yes. chains are expendable. dont worry about it, just keep it for a dummy to pull th enew one over new sprockets. buy a motion pro chain breaker and fit the new chain to the correct length. get an extra master link so you can keep it on your key chain

    [​IMG]

    did you throw away the gearbox sprocket yet?

    start with new stuff and worry less.
     
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  9. Sundance

    Sundance Well-Known Member

    Aug 2, 2021
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    Yes, I replaced the gearbox sprocket along with the rear wheel sprocket. Looking at the various chain lengths for sale, it looks like I will need a chain breaker/riveter in order to fit a new chain so thanks for the advice. So in the end I am looking for a 530 chain of about 110 links or so to fit? Do you have any advice on a brand of chain? Thanks again SR!
     
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  10. speedrattle

    speedrattle Senior Member

    Feb 19, 2021
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    #270 speedrattle, Mar 28, 2022
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2022
    i always get 110 and then just shorten them to whatever i need. i play with gear ratios a lot so my chain lengths are never the same from change to change. dry-frame triumphs dont give you enough slot in the swingarm to play with so some people grind the slots a bit longer. i never have.

    cheap no-name chains are worthless. i once ran two of them back to back on my LSR machine and they each kinked up after less than a day of admittedly very hard use. i use DID 530 chains now with a master link (not riveted) and they last a long time.

    renold chains also appear to last well, but any good chain wil last longer than you ever thought possible if you clean it and lube it regularly.

    i take em off every now and then and wire-brush them in kerosene in a parts washer to get the grit off, then re-install and use a spray-on sticky lube. the chains last much longer than my memory of how old they are.

    that may say more about my memory than it does about chains, but remember, a broken chain or master link can kink up and knock a piece out of your cases above the gearbox sprocket, so saving money there isnt really a good long term strategy.
     
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  11. Iron

    Iron Elite Member

    Dec 29, 2021
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    Agree with SR. Go for DID with a link.
     
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  12. Sundance

    Sundance Well-Known Member

    Aug 2, 2021
    217
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    Arlington, VA
    Thanks all for the chain advice. A new one is coming.
     
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  13. Sundance

    Sundance Well-Known Member

    Aug 2, 2021
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    Arlington, VA
    Primary chain oiler tube (E4704) - I’m wondering if there is any advice about installing this tube. It seems that you simply insert the tube into the case oil feed opening and then into the clip (E4705) that holds the tube over the primary sprocket? I’d imagine it should be trimmed if it is too long? I am not sure if this was even on the bike when I took it apart. Thanks.

    IMG_2776.jpeg
     
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  14. Iron

    Iron Elite Member

    Dec 29, 2021
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    Always lots of discussion over why this is even needed. I've always figured that the Triumph engineers knew a lot more than I ever will about their engines.
    They decided to use this to ensure oil is not only thrown around the outside of the primary chain but collected and drips through this into the inside of the chain at the crank sprocket.
    We've all done our timing with the later engines through the timing plate and it's like striking an oil field in Texas with the engine started.
    But if it's good enough for them, then it's good enough for me.
    Yes, cut it to length.
    The clips are hard to find for some reason so keep hold of any spares.
     
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  15. Sundance

    Sundance Well-Known Member

    Aug 2, 2021
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    Thanks Iron. I've got the clip and the tube so will put it on. It does seem like the sprocket would be getting lots of oil without this.
     
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  16. speedrattle

    speedrattle Senior Member

    Feb 19, 2021
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    my OIF T120 never spits oil back at me through the timing hole outboard of the rotor. why is that?

    it has the oil level regulated through the drive side main bearing, and i cant remember whether the plastic hose is still there.

    if i run the motor with the timing hole cover loose on its three screws it rattles back and forth like a machine gun, but i never have oil splashing out.

    i wonder why
     
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  17. Iron

    Iron Elite Member

    Dec 29, 2021
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    Maybe you need to put the little plastic hose on. :)
     
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  18. speedrattle

    speedrattle Senior Member

    Feb 19, 2021
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    lol
    maybe thats it
     
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  19. Sundance

    Sundance Well-Known Member

    Aug 2, 2021
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    Stator stud nut problem- So I just got my brand new stator studs and new nuts, nice and shiny. I was adjusting things to get the right clearance between stator and rotor and once it looked good I went to torque the nuts to 20 ft lb. I got to 15 ft lb with the nuts and then when going to 20 the upper left stud nut would not torque, but kept spinning. Stud was fine in the case. So it looks like this brand new nut failed, and just kept spinning. Problem is I can’t get it off the stud now. I tried gripping it with pliers and pulling while I tried to remove it but it stayed. I tried to insert a small blade between the nut and stator to put some pressure and rotated but it wouldn’t some off. I ending up taking the stator off by patiently unscrewing the studs one by one until I could get the stator off - with the stud still attached. So I’m trying to figure out how to get the nut off. I’ve put a vise grip around the stator stud and held the nut, pulling on the vise grips while rotating. Any ideas about how to get this nut off. Obviously I will have to get a new nut. Perhaps I should try to cut the nut off with a Dremel cut off blade. Thanks for any advice. Has anyone ever had this problem with one of these type of nuts that are locking nuts?

    IMG_2794.jpeg
     
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  20. Sundance

    Sundance Well-Known Member

    Aug 2, 2021
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    By the way, I talked with the guys at Classic British Spares, where I purchased the new stator studs and nut. The guy said the stator doesn’t need 15 to 20 lbs, that was too much. Said 10 lbs was enough with a bit of loctite. Of course the manual says 20 lbs. I’d be interested in any one else’s take on this - as well as any other torque setting in the manual that might need to be managed differently. Thanks.
     
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